Interesting Reads

5 Things that must Change to End Gender Inequality at Work

It took less than 40 years to put a man on the moon, but it will take 170 years to put a woman in the board room in many places on our planet. According to the latest Global Gender Gap Report, this is the number of years before we close the global economic gender gap. Closing the global political gender gap is projected to take even longer. READ MORE
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How Anything Perceived As Women’s Work Immediately Sheds Its Value

The gender wage gap has long been an issue of importance for feminists, and one that consistently finds itself on the UN and government agendas. Despite this, there is a persistent idea among many in mainstream society (mostly men, and some women) that the gender wage gap is simply a myth, that women are paid less on average because of the specific choices that women make in their careers. Everything, they claim, from the industry a woman chooses to establish herself in, to the hours she chooses to work, to her decision to take time off to spend with her children, and so on, leads to lower pay, for reasons, they confidently assure us, that have nothing at all to do with sexism. READ MORE

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Understanding Family Structure and Women’s Empowerment

In a study aimed toward a greater understanding of women’s empowerment, Sisir Debnath, Assistant Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the Indian School of Business, sheds light on how family structure, a relatively less studied factor of women empowerment, impacts female autonomy in developing countries. Debnath’s study compares women living in nuclear households (due to the death of the patriarch) with those living in joint families. READ MORE
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What Work Looks Like for Women in Their 50s

“The fifties was the most exciting career decade of my life so far,” says Babette Pettersen, “and it looks like my options are only getting better as I turn 60.” Babette is one of a growing number of people - especially women - whose careers have accelerated as they have approached what used to be considered retirement age. READ MORE