CasesKuriyan, Vikram; Ved, Unnati; Shah, Geetika. "Azim Premji Trust: The Endowment Model in An Emerging Market", 2018Read Description >Close >Discipline: Finance
Industry: Asset management
Length: 27p
Subjects covered: Asset management; Investment management; Philanthropies; Portfolio management; Trusts
Publication Date: December 28, 2017
 
Description: 
The Azim Premji Trust, among the largest philanthropic trusts in India, had its origins in 2001, when Azim Premji transferred Wipro shares worth US$ 125 million to the trust. As of March 31, 2017, the trust had a corpus fund of US$ 9 billion. The trust's goal was to support Premji's philanthropic pursuits through two organizations -- the Azim Premji Foundation and Azim Premji Philanthropic Initiatives. Both beneficiaries had distinct, ambitious philanthropic objectives that required large, ongoing funding. The trust's Chief Endowment Officer, K. R. Lakshminarayana, had been given the responsibility of planning the future of one of India's first endowments. The endowment was tasked with maximizing total return over a long horizon. Therefore, the trust had deliberately been created as a taxable entity to allow it the freedom to make large investments in equities and alternatives. The case describes the challenges Lakshminarayana, widely known as Lan, faced in arriving at a strategic asset allocation model in an emerging market with limited investment talent and investment firms and constraints on the trust's ability to invest outside India.

Learning objective:
  1. Identify and describe an exhaustive list of investment philosophies and investment opportunities available to the Azim Premji Trust.
  2. Identify and describe any changes in the ways through which the Azim Premji Trust invests as institutions and investment opportunities improve in India.


CasesPiyush Kumar; Sonia Mehrotra; Geetika Shah. "Be Well Hospitals - Branding A Mid-Tier Service in A Two-Tier Market", 2018Read Description >Close >Discipline: Service Management
Industry: Hospitals
Length: 14p
Subjects covered: Brand positioning; Branding; Marketing; Service management
Publication Date: July 11, 2017
 
Description: 
Be Well Hospitals - a multi-specialty secondary healthcare chain of hospitals is set up in the suburbs, industrial towns and district headquarters of the South Indian state of Tamil Nadu. The hospital chain co-founded by Dr. C.J.Vetrievel in 2011, fulfills the need of quality healthcare services in secondary healthcare market segment. They provide access to high-quality primary and secondary healthcare services at affordable price to the semi-urban and rural population through their chain of multi-specialty hospitals. In the four and half years, since its founding, Be Well has set up eight hospitals with a combined capacity of more than 280 beds and has treated close to 500,000 patients. The case describes Be Well's operations and the marketing initiatives it deployed to increase the adoption of its service concept in a two -tiered market. it provides information about the content of Be Well's past advertising communications and the media choices it made to build its brand. The management is grappling with the dilemma of brand building and educating potential customers about the high quality of care available at Be Well in a format that had a smaller footprint than its big city rivals. A complicating factor is creating a three-tier market with the limited resources in a setting where the customers are used to a two-tier service structure. They face a resource allocation challenge with regard to the mix of media-based and non-media based communication platforms. The management needs to decided on the choice of service attributes or dimensions around which the Be Well brand to be built and whether to focus on local branding of each hospital or develop a unified and common brand across all its facilities in the state.

Learning objective:
Understanding consumer's decision process to choose between private versus public healthcare institutions and among primary, secondary and tertiary institutions; Challenge of building a pioneering brand by a private enterprise in the secondary healthcare category;Choosing the appropriate marketing mix and operational instruments to be build the category and position the brand; Challenges of sustaining a pioneering brand over the long run in the face of the competition from tertiary care centers.

Cases. "Clubb International: Revisiting the Marketing Strategy", 2018Read Description >Close >Discipline: Marketing,  Entrepreneurship
Industry: Retail Trade
Length: 15p
Subjects covered: marketing strategy, product innovation, family business
Publication Date: February 05, 2018
 
Description: 
Clubb International Private Limited (Clubb) was a 26-year-old travel goods and accessories firm based in Kolkata, India. The owner believed in a complete ownership model. The firm had come a long way since its beginning and now had close to 200 product offerings. In March 2017, the owner’s son (the second-generation director of Clubb) felt it was time to scale up the business and acquire a leadership position in the market. Clubb had at its core a legacy of innovation, quality, and a bootstrapping philosophy, but it might not be conducive to the new strategic vision. For the road ahead, the company needed a professional and streamlined product and retail strategy. Could the desired scale of operations be achieved with the complete ownership model and mantra of no advertising?

Learning objective:
The case can be taught as part of a foundation course in marketing in a postgraduate management program or used to illustrate strategy formulation in a second-year strategic marketing course. Discussion of the case gives students the opportunity to do the following:
  1. Understand how an entrepreneur translates his vision into his firm's business philosophy.
  2. Understand how macro environmental factors and a competitive landscape determine the context that strongly affects a company's business strategy.
  3. Comprehend how a firm's overall strategy is translated into its marketing strategy.
  4. Carry out a financial analysis to evaluate the company's business performance.
  5. Work toward conceptualizing a marketing plan for achieving the firm's future goals.
     


CasesNupur Pavan Bang, Khemchand H. Sakaldeepi, Ramabhadran S. Thirumalai. "The Bombay Stock Exchange: Liquidity Enhancement Incentive Programmes", 2017Read Description >Close >Issues: liquidity, payment for order, exchanges, market microstructure, stocks
Disciplines:  Finance, International
Industries: Finance and Insurance
Setting: India, Large, 2013
Length: 16 pages (7 pages of text)
Intended Audience: MBA/Postgraduate
Publication Date: December 13, 2016

Abstract:
In 2013, the chief business officer at the Bombay Stock Exchange needed to prepare a recommendation on whether to pursue liquidity enhancement schemes in the equity cash market. The Bombay Stock Exchange, the oldest stock exchange in Asia, had held a monopoly in India until 1994, when the National Stock Exchange was launched. When derivatives were introduced to the Indian stock exchanges in 2000, the Bombay Stock Exchange had been unprepared, and the National Stock Exchange soon captured the entire derivatives market. In 2011, the Securities and Exchange Board of India approved the introduction of the Liquidity Enhancement Incentive Programmes on illiquid securities in the derivatives segment. The Bombay Stock Exchange then introduced the incentives for various illiquid products in the derivatives segment, but lost profit as a result of the incentives it paid out. Had the Liquidity Enhancement Incentive Programmes improved liquidity in the derivatives segment? Was it worth sacrificing profit to gain liquidity and market share? The chief business officer needed to address the long-term benefits of liquidity enhancement schemes and the merits of introducing such schemes to the Bombay Stock Exchange’s equity cash market.

Learning Objective:
This case is appropriate for an undergraduate or graduate course on security markets, with a specific focus on market liquidity and market structure. It may also be used in an undergraduate or graduate course on competitive strategy to illustrate how incentives can change competition, especially across two almost identical products: the National Stock Exchange’s Nifty Index and the Bombay Stock Exchange’s 100 Index. This case provides an alternative scenario to order-driven markets, whereby a stock exchange is able to significantly improve liquidity by incentivizing traders to participate in its derivatives market. The case can also be used to revisit the basic terminologies in derivatives and the unique features of the Indian stock market. After completion of the case, students will be able to
  • debate the importance of liquidity and how stock exchanges compete for liquidity;
  • compare the purchase order concept prevalent in the United States with the liquidity incentives schemes introduced in India;
  • analyze how liquidity incentive schemes can be used for the benefit of the entire securities market; and
  • understand the basic terminology of derivatives and the unique features of Indian stock markets.

     


CasesGhoshal, Tanuka ; Shah, Geetika ; Pereira, Arun . "Reinventing Officer's Choice Whisky: Spoiled for Choice", 2017Read Description >Close >Discipline: Marketing
Industry: Alcoholic beverages
Length: 14 pages
Subjects covered: Advertising; Advertising campaigns; Brand management; Branding; Market positioning; Market research; Marketing; Marketing communications
Publication Date: December 20, 2016

Description: 
This case is designed to highlight the vital role of promotion, the fourth "P" of the marketing mix, in a brand reinvention exercise. Using the context of the brand reinvention journey of Officer's Choice Whisky (OCW), the case highlights the importance and need for syncing brand objectives and communication objectives so as to build brand relevance in a competitive environment, increase revenue and enhance customer loyalty. The case also highlights the importance of systematic market research in identifying brand weaknesses and providing direction for effective marketing communications.Ahmed Rahimtoola, Head of Marketing at Allied Blenders and Distillers (ABD), was leading the process of conducting an extensive brand reinvention exercise for Officer's Choice. Market research had established the need for brand reinvention, indicating that Officer's Choice had to overcome the challenges of low brand salience, lack of emotional connect with customers, and outdated brand communication. Accordingly, the best advertising agencies in India were invited to come up with creatives that would answer the following question: How should Officer's Choice reposition and repackage itself and reconnect with consumers? ABD had the tough task of choosing the creative that held the magic recipe that would strategically weave brand objectives and communication objectives to yield optimal benefits. In discussing the firm's creative options, the case brings to light the crucial aspects of a brand reinvention process, the role of communication objectives in brand reinvention, and the mechanics of a successful marriage of marketing communication and brand strategy objectives.

Learning objective: 
  1. To illustrate the challenges of brand reinvention and the opportunities provided by marketing communications.
  2. To understand how branding and positioning strategy should stem from consumer behavior insights gathered from market research.
  3. To demonstrate that the selection of ad creatives can be facilitated by using systematic criteria that take into consideration the strategy of the firm, key brand objectives and communication objectives.

     


CasesChakrabarti, Rajesh;  Sujlana, Digvijay Singh . "SREI Sahaj E-Village (A)", 2017Read Description >Close >Discipline: Service Management
Length: 22 pages
Subjects covered: Business model innovation; Service management
Publication Date: December 22, 2016

Description: 
Sahaj e-Village Limited, an initiative of SREI Infrastructure Finance Ltd, hoped to answer the need of the Indian government's National e-Governance Plan (NeGP) to set up 100,000 Common Service Centres (CSCs) across rural India in 2006. This figure was subsequently revised to 250,000 CSCs in 2009. Sahaj aimed to bridge the digital divide between urban and rural India and set up one of the largest brick and mortar --and human --networks in rural India. With close to 27,000 IT-backed centers in villages with a population of less than 10,000 and 50 critical services in the domains of microinsurance, education, utility and government-to-citizen (G2C) services to over 300,000,000 rural people, Sahaj e-Village was literally taking urban services to the remotest nooks of rural India. Sahaj CSCs would provide rural consumers with direct access to modern, state-of-the-art technological facilities and computer education, thus dovetailing with its long-term plans of providing Internet connectivity across rural India. Case A, set in July 2010, presents the tough challenge that the top management at Sahaj e-Village Ltd had on its hands. It was serving a virtually untouched rural market through a greenfield project with a jittery workforce in place and was justifiably concerned about the viability and sustainability of the business.

Learning objective: 
The case introduces the reader to the fiduciary concerns of social enterprises and the restrictions faced by government-led enterprises when they plan to scale up of their organizations. Students are led to analyze organized and unorganized employment opportunities and challenges. The case lets students analyze and understand the:
  1. Dynamics of the social networking market
  2. e-Village business model and
  3. Importance of an appropriate business model in the rural social entrepreneurship space.


CasesChakrabarti, Rajesh;  Sujlana, Digvijay Singh . "SREI Sahaj E-Village (A)", 2017Read Description >Close >Discipline: Service Management
Length: 22 pages
Subjects covered: Business model innovation; Service management
Publication Date: December 22, 2016

Description: 
Sahaj e-Village Limited, an initiative of SREI Infrastructure Finance Ltd, hoped to answer the need of the Indian government's National e-Governance Plan (NeGP) to set up 100,000 Common Service Centres (CSCs) across rural India in 2006. This figure was subsequently revised to 250,000 CSCs in 2009. Sahaj aimed to bridge the digital divide between urban and rural India and set up one of the largest brick and mortar --and human --networks in rural India. With close to 27,000 IT-backed centers in villages with a population of less than 10,000 and 50 critical services in the domains of microinsurance, education, utility and government-to-citizen (G2C) services to over 300,000,000 rural people, Sahaj e-Village was literally taking urban services to the remotest nooks of rural India. Sahaj CSCs would provide rural consumers with direct access to modern, state-of-the-art technological facilities and computer education, thus dovetailing with its long-term plans of providing Internet connectivity across rural India. Case A, set in July 2010, presents the tough challenge that the top management at Sahaj e-Village Ltd had on its hands. It was serving a virtually untouched rural market through a greenfield project with a jittery workforce in place and was justifiably concerned about the viability and sustainability of the business.

Learning objective: 
The case introduces the reader to the fiduciary concerns of social enterprises and the restrictions faced by government-led enterprises when they plan to scale up of their organizations. Students are led to analyze organized and unorganized employment opportunities and challenges. The case lets students analyze and understand the:
  1. Dynamics of the social networking market
  2. e-Village business model and
  3. Importance of an appropriate business model in the rural social entrepreneurship space.


CasesChakrabarti, Rajesh;  Sujlana, Digvijay Singh . "SREI Sahaj E-Village (B)", 2017Read Description >Close >Discipline: Service Management
Length: 14 pages
Subjects covered: Business model innovation; Service management
Publication Date: December 22, 2016

Description: 
Sahaj e-Village Limited, an initiative of SREI Infrastructure Finance Ltd, hoped to answer the need of the Indian government's National e-Governance Plan (NeGP) to set up 100,000 Common Service Centres (CSCs) across rural India in 2006. This figure was subsequently revised to 250,000 CSCs in 2009. Sahaj aimed to bridge the digital divide between urban and rural India and set up one of the largest brick and mortar --and human --networks in rural India. With close to 27,000 IT-backed centers in villages with a population of less than 10,000 and 50 critical services in the domains of microinsurance, education, utility and government-to-citizen (G2C) services to over 300,000,000 rural people, Sahaj e-Village was literally taking urban services to the remotest nooks of rural India. Sahaj CSCs would provide rural consumers with direct access to modern, state-of-the-art technological facilities and computer education, thus dovetailing with its long-term plans of providing Internet connectivity across rural India. Case B moves ahead from the challenge described in Case A and outlines Sahaj's transformation process. Starting August 2010, Sahaj guided its troops through an ideological transformation that would take the organization from being primarily a government service provider to an enterprising business entity capable of fending for itself. In order to achieve this goal, Sahaj took the important first step of understanding the intricacies and dynamics of the relationships among the various stakeholders involved in the project. This, in a sense, proved to be a breakthrough in the organization's transformation process.

Learning objective: 
The case introduces the reader to the fiduciary concerns of social enterprises and the restrictions faced by government-led enterprises when they plan to scale up of their organizations. Students are led to analyze organized and unorganized employment opportunities and challenges. The case lets students analyze and understand the:
  1. Dynamics of the social networking market
  2. e-Village business model and
  3. Importance of an appropriate business model in the rural social entrepreneurship space.


CasesSingh, Davinder;  Sahu, Anuj . "Forbes Technosys Limited (B): Bill Payment Kiosk Business", 2017Read Description >Close >Issues: business model, mobile, billing
Disciplines:  General Management/Strategy
Industries: Other Services
Setting: India, Medium, 2010
Length: 6 pages (4 pages of text)
Intended Audience: MBA/Postgraduate
Publication Date: December 19, 2016

Abstract:
In May 2010, Forbes Technosys Limited (FTL) was not doing well. After more than a year, the company’s bill payment kiosk business was losing money and no longer seemed viable. The time had come to re-evaluate all aspects of this business line and make decisions regarding FTL’s future course of action. Accordingly, FTL’s chief executive officer proposed an idea regarding prepaid mobile recharges using the existing bill payment kiosks, along with a new technology platform for this purpose. He hoped that handheld terminals could be used by retail-level franchisees to sell recharges to prepaid mobile users. Essentially, FTL had three options: should the company persist with or pivot the service provider business model, or “perish” the complete solution provider idea entirely and revert to being a product manufacturer? Whichever strategy FTL chose, it would have to limit and balance both operating and capital expenses. Use with 9B16M221

Learning Objective:
This case can be used during a course on strategic innovation management, which is usually scheduled in the second half of an MBA/postgraduate program or executive MBA program. It can be used to teach students about the following concepts:
  • Making strategic choices about business models, especially the choice between being a service provider and a product manufacturer while pursuing innovation.
  • Making decisions as to whether to persist, pivot, or perish in a particular business model while pursuing new business opportunities.




CasesSingh, Davinder;  Sahu, Anuj . "Forbes Technosys Limited (A): Bill Payment Kiosk Business", 2017Read Description >Close >Issues: business model, mobile, billing
Disciplines:  General Management/Strategy
Industries: Other Services
Setting: India, Medium, 2010
Length: 9 pages (7 pages of text)
Intended Audience: MBA/Postgraduate
Publication Date: December 19, 2016

Abstract:
In May 2010, Forbes Technosys Limited (FTL) was not doing well. After more than a year, the company’s bill payment kiosk business was losing money and no longer seemed viable. The time had come to re-evaluate all aspects of this business line and make decisions regarding FTL’s future course of action. Accordingly, FTL’s chief executive officer proposed an idea regarding prepaid mobile recharges using the existing bill payment kiosks, along with a new technology platform for this purpose. He hoped that handheld terminals could be used by retail-level franchisees to sell recharges to prepaid mobile users. Essentially, FTL had three options: should the company persist with or pivot the service provider business model, or “perish” the complete solution provider idea entirely and revert to being a product manufacturer? Whichever strategy FTL chose, it would have to limit and balance both operating and capital expenses.

Learning Objective:
This case can be used during a course on strategic innovation management, which is usually scheduled in the second half of an MBA/postgraduate program or executive MBA program. It can be used to teach students about the following concepts:
  • Making strategic choices about business models, especially the choice between being a service provider and a product manufacturer while pursuing innovation
  • Making decisions as to whether to persist, pivot, or perish in a particular business model while pursuing new business opportunities


Cases Gupta, Pooja;  Sethi, Madhvi , Darroch A. Robertson. "The Game of Financial Ratios", 2017Read Description >Close >Issues: financial analysis, ratio analysis, financial statement
Disciplines:  Accounting,  International
Setting: India, Large, 2013
Length: 3 pages (1 page of text)
Intended Audience: Undergraduate/MBA
Publication Date: January 16, 2017

Abstract:
his exercise revolves around the rivalry between two financial analysts. Upset by their constant game of one-upmanship, an advisor to the governor of the Reserve Bank of India came up with a challenge for them to prove who was better. He provided them with financial data for the financial year ending March 2014 from 10 anonymous companies and asked them to match the financial data with specific industries given in a list. The challenge was timed, and the winner was to be determined on the basis of who could come up with the right combination first.

Learning Objective:
The case can be taught in a financial accounting or financial management course of an MBA program. It provides students with an exercise in which, with the help of ratio analysis, they identify the industries to which companies belong. It helps students identify unique patterns of operations and asset structures in different industries. After working through the case and the assignment question, students will be able to:
debate the importance of liquidity and how stock exchanges compete for liquidity;
  • understand and interpret financial data from different publicly listed firms in India;
  • infer operating cycles and cash cycles of specific industries in India using information about business operations of different industries; and
  • use financial ratios and pattern analysis to identify industries in India.


Cases Sharma, Ruppal Walia. "Rays Culinary Delights: Building a Start-Up Brand", 2017Read Description >Close >Issues: building brand identity, branding for starts-ups, brand positioning, launching a brand, restaurant
Disciplines:  Marketing,  Entrepreneurship
Industries: Accommodation & Food Services
Setting: India, Small, 2015
Length: 14 pages (10 pages of text)
Intended Audience: MBA/Postgraduate
Publication Date: January 17, 2017

Abstract:
In April 2015, two years after launching Sattviko, a casual dining restaurant, the venture had three restaurants in Delhi. The two entrepreneurs who had established Sattviko wanted to continue growing but were feeling cash-constrained. Meanwhile, the online technology-based food industry in India was growing with an influx of venture funding. The entrepreneurs could take advantage of this wave and pursue venture capital, but they might have to shift their business focus to do so. Should they shift the Sattviko value proposition and brand positioning to grow their business?

Learning Objective:
This case highlights key decisions faced by start-ups when developing a new brand. It demonstrates how brand values need to be articulated at the start of the planning process, how this forms the basis of the brand’s long-term identity, and what factors need to be considered when evaluating a change in the brand positioning. The case also explains how developing the brand identity and positioning involves not just deciding what to be, but also what not to be. This case is suitable for teaching a brand management or entrepreneurship course in MBA programs. After completing the case, students will understand
debate the importance of liquidity and how stock exchanges compete for liquidity;
  • what constitutes the building blocks of a brand's essence;
  • how to plan a brand's identity;
  • how to define the brand's positioning; and
  • what factors need to be considered when evaluating changes in the brand's positioning strategy.


CasesSharma, Kirti; Sapra, Puneet . "Dulux TileShield: Relaunching a Brand", 2017Read Description >Close >Issues: consumer behavior, pricing, brand relaunch, positioning, paint
Disciplines:  International,  Marketing
Industries: Other Services
Setting: India, Large, 2012
Length: 16 pages (8 pages of text)
Intended Audience: MBA/Postgraduate
Publication Date: February 28, 2017

Abstract:
In 2012, the marketing department at AkzoNobel India Ltd., a major paints company, faced a key decision concerning the possible relaunch of TileShield, a premium roof tile paint in the company’s exterior paints division. Since its inception, TileShield had led the market, especially in the southern part of India, but despite growth in the demand for roof tile paints, TileShield sales had stagnated in 2011–12. Faced with falling sales and intense competition, the company had to decide whether to maintain the status quo or draft a relaunch for the brand. The marketing department would have to make some quick decisions on value proposition and pricing.

Learning Objective:
The case can be used in the core marketing management course of an MBA program to illustrate the concepts of pricing, consumer behaviour, and product positioning. More specifically, it can be used to accomplish the following tasks:
  • Investigate product pricing and consumer behaviour in the exterior paints market.
  • Analyze the options of changing the value proposition of a brand, relaunching a brand, and using the existing brand equity of other brands in the product line to enhance sales.
  • Identify the positioning point in the existing category.
 


CasesPanda, Abinash;  ​Jain, Anshul;  ​Mishra, Samir. "Schneider Electric India: Leadership Challenges", 2017Read Description >Close >Issues: leadership, adaptive leadership, plant-level leadership, power, hydro
Disciplines:  Entrepreneurship, Organizational Behaviour/Leadership
Industries: Manufacturing
Setting: India, Medium, 2015
Length: 16 pages (7 pages of text)
Intended Audience: MBA/Postgraduate
Publication Date: March 7, 2017

Abstract:
In May 2015, the new director at Schneider Electric’s plant in Rudrapur, India, faced a challenging situation. The company had an ongoing struggle with quality issues and consistently missed its production targets. From a human relations perspective, employee engagement and morale were low and the shop-floor workers had very little respect for the plant’s management team. The new director quickly launched a program of human resource initiatives aimed to turn the plant around, but in the midst of his efforts, a sister plant submitted a high-volume order that seemed well beyond Rudrapur’s production capabilities. Against the advice of his superiors, and in the face of some resistance from his staff at the plant, the plant director accepted the order and used an adaptive leadership approach to implement several plant-level changes in the production processes at Rudrapur. While the team had made a lot of progress in improving the overall function of the Rudrapur plant, there was still a long way to go and a huge production hurdle to be crossed. Were the director’s interventions likely to succeed? Should he adopt a different approach to meet the challenges?

Learning Objective:
This case is appropriate for an undergraduate or graduate course on security markets, with a specific focus on market liquidity and market structure. It may also be used in an undergraduate or graduate course on competitive strategy to illustrate how incentives can change competition, especially across two almost identical products: the National Stock Exchange’s Nifty Index and the Bombay Stock Exchange’s 100 Index. This case provides an alternative scenario to order-driven markets, whereby a stock exchange is able to significantly improve liquidity by incentivizing traders to participate in its derivatives market. The case can also be used to revisit the basic terminologies in derivatives and the unique features of the Indian stock market. After completion of the case, students will be able to
  • debate the importance of liquidity and how stock exchanges compete for liquidity;
  • compare the purchase order concept prevalent in the United States with the liquidity incentives schemes introduced in India;
  • analyze how liquidity incentive schemes can be used for the benefit of the entire securities market; and
  • understand the basic terminology of derivatives and the unique features of Indian stock markets.
     


CasesMathew, Jones;  Dey, Banasree. "The Vanca: Reworking Digital Marketing Strategy", 2017Read Description >Close >Issues: digital marketing, online traffic building, digital strategy, online apparel retail
Disciplines:  Marketing,  Entrepreneurship,  International
Industries: Other Services
Setting: India, Medium, 2016
Length: 16 pages (9 pages of text)
Intended Audience: MBA/Postgraduate
Publication Date: March 13, 2017

Abstract:
Since its inception in 2011, The Vanca, an Indian e-commerce brand selling women’s Western apparel, had come a long way. After overcoming initial problems typical of many entrepreneurial start-ups, The Vanca made significant progress in terms of sales. However, its brand-building activities had not been very successful. Having concentrated entirely on online digital marketing, the company did not see the expected results. The digital space offered many opportunities, but it was replete with cases of promising companies facing failure. In addition to the dynamic nature of the online retail space, there were new government regulations in India as of March 2016, which restricted online retailers in many ways, in an attempt to bring order to the previously unregulated industry. Accordingly, in May 2016, The Vanca hired a specific digital marketing manager with the goal of reworking the brand’s digital strategy. The company's management knew that multiple marketing issues needed to be addressed in order for The Vanca to achieve success.

Learning Objective:
This case is suitable for postgraduate courses on digital marketing. It asks students to analyze an Internet brand whose digital marketing efforts are not working as expected. The case presents many questions regarding the role of a digital marketing manager in the pursuit of an integrated digital marketing approach to convert web traffic into customers, and to build brand awareness. After completion of this case, students will be able to
  • appreciate the opportunities and challenges in adopting an integrated approach to digital brand marketing;
  • understand that website traffic alone is not enough, that conversions are equally important;
  • value the power of Google search pages in helping a brand enter the consumer’s consideration set;
  • focus on product, promotion, and place to counter restrictions on discounting (price); and
  • assess the role of a digital marketing manager in building a brand.


CasesMody, Pallavi; Chittoor, Raveendra. "Attaining the Next Orbit: Dilemmas of a Family Managed Business - Natural Ice Cream", 2017Read Description >Close >Discipline: Entrepreneurship
Industry: Dairy products
Length: 12p
Subjects covered: Entrepreneurship; Family businesses; Innovation
Publication Date: December 31, 2016
 
Description: 
The case is about the concerns of second generation entrepreneurs in a family managed business who aspire to attain the next orbit, the next level of success in the business. Natural Ice Cream was started by the father in 1980s. The passionate ice cream maker made two small innovations; one, a product innovation in the form of using only natural ingredients. He was so creative that he could come up with 125 combinations of fresh and dried fruits in ice cream. Two, a marketing innovation in the form of selling ice cream only in exclusive ice cream parlours. Both were novel ideas of the time and became the 'Unique Selling Propositions' (USPs). The business expanded over the three decades and with the help of his sons changed the scale and adapted best practices of management. The expansion path was carefully drawn up by preserving the USPs of the business. The franchise route for expansion was used. Manufacturing remained at a central location to keep strict quality control. Having taken their business from a small dream to INR 1 billion niche brand in the artisan ice cream segment, the owners at Naturals were dreaming big. They were restless and anxious to enter the next orbit and aspired to become a pan-India and global brand.

Learning objective:
  1. To understand the significance of passion and 'follow your dream' attitude in entrepreneurs.
  2. To understand the importance of 'small innovations' in product or marketing that turn into USP and critical success factor in small businesses.
  3. To understand the role of professional management to take the family managed business to the next orbit
  4. To appreciate the importance of conflict resolution between the generations in family business.


CasesDamaraju; Naga Lakshmi,  Khangura; Navneet Kaur. "Modak Analytics: Shaping the Future in Digital India?", 2017Read Description >Close >Discipline: Strategy
Length: 16p
Subjects covered: Analytics; Corporate strategy; Data; Data warehouses; Entrepreneurship; Organizational development
Publication Date: January 31, 2017
 
Description: 
In 2008, Aarti Joshi, founder and CEO of Modak Analytics, returned to India after working in the data analytics space in the US for seven years. At that time, India's SMEs were unaware of the benefits of using their POS data to differentiate themselves from competition. Hence, Modak Analytics was incorporated to serve these SMEs. However, soon the CEO realized the diminished potential of this target market, which was plagued by wafer thin profit margins, lack of long term strategy for their companies, and lack of awareness towards the benefits of big data analytics. Modak Analytics then started targeting the more attractive BFSI segment. The company soon developed advanced analytics products for this sector. Major ones included Enterprise Data Warehouse, RapidETL product, Master Data Management and Campaign Management System. Modak Analytics' MDM software could help banks to achieve desired differentiation in the marketplace. This was possible due to the unique customer and household profiles that MDM helped create for the bank. The next step in the company's growth ladder came when Modak Analytics was asked by a bank to create profiles of not only its current customers, but also its potential customers. The exercise that started as data collection within the city of Hyderabad in India soon converted into a mammoth exercise when a pan-India political party approached Modak Analytics to do the voter profile analysis for the whole country. This was a herculean task as it involved deciphering the PDFs collected from electoral commission, which were in various languages and very heterogeneous from one state to another. At the time of the case, Modak Analytics was at a crossroads with respect to its future business strategy. Modak Analytics can either specialize in data integration and target the big markets of Europe and the US or it can aim to become a leading data aggregating company in India, given its huge repository of Indian voter profiles.

Learning objective:
  1. Understand how to define a relevant industry and how to determine which industry (industries) or industry segments are more or less attractive given the resources and capabilities of this organization.
  2. Demonstrate that the ideas of coherence in corporate strategy also apply (with relevantly defined objectives) in the context of entrepreneurial organizations where the seeds of future corporation are being sown.


CasesMehta, Sunita; Sharma, Surya Kant; Pereira, Arun. "Bhagwati Products Limited - Making in India for Micromax", 2017Read Description >Close >Discipline: Strategy
Industry: Computers & electronics
Length: 22p
Subjects covered: Capabilities; Competitive advantage; Cost leadership strategy; Industry analysis; Related diversification; Strategy
Publication Date: December 26, 2016
 
Description: 
Emerging markets have become an attractive destination for multinationals as they provide these companies with high growth potential due to low product penetration and also help them in reducing costs of production due to reduced labor costs. The case brings out the trajectory of growth of Micromax Informatics Limited which started as a company depending on China and Taiwan for manufacturing of their handsets because of better technological infrastructure, stronger supply chain and cost effective workforce. As the government enhanced import duty on CBU (Completely Built Unit) electronic products and reduced excise duty and import duty on SKD (Semi Knocked Down) units required for manufacturing of electronic products, Micromax started its production facility, Bhagwati Products Limited in India and reduced import of finished electronic products to a large extent. To keep the cost low all across the value chain, it focused on development of indigenous design and manufacturing capabilities to achieve higher localization. This helped Micromax in keeping the cost of the products low and thus being a cost leader in the market. The case also brings out how costs can be kept low by utilizing central and state government initiatives in providing subsidies that helped the company build competitive advantage and how these specific actions resulted in creation of a vibrant electronics industry in the country. This case focuses on the specific issues faced by Bhagwati Products Limited, the production arm of Micromax in production of mobile phones locally, with regard to sourcing of raw material, manpower, research and development, competition and reduction in cost of production.

The case also discusses the decision dilemma faced by the chairman on diversification of products to consumer electronics or to move into new territories with the core product in context of increased competition from multinationals in India.

Learning objective:
To understand Micromax's growth trajectory. -To provide insights into the electronic industry and information about main competitors in India. -To understand the relevance and significance of government policies in emerging economies. -To assess positioning of Micromax and analyze growth strategies of Micromax/BPL. -To set appropriate context for students to take decisions and evaluate alternatives available to Micromax/BPL to formulate strategies in context of increased competition from MNCs.

CasesMehrotra, Sonia;  Pereira, Arun. "GOQii: Envisioning a New Fitness Future (B)", 2017Read Description >Close >Discipline: Entrepreneurship
Industry: Apparel accessories, Fitness, Fitness equipment
Length: 6p
Subjects covered: Artificial intelligence; Entrepreneurship; Health care; Technology
Publication Date: December 31, 2016
 
Description: 
Supplement to case ISB079. Gondal, a serial entrepreneur, was supported by top technology experts in GOQii's angel round of funding. Case A details GOQii's journey from its incorporation in 2014 until April 2016. It describes GOQii's product-service offering of wearable fitness band technology supplemented with remote personalized coaching, its launch in the Indian market, and its emergence as a pioneer of a new category of product in the health and lifestyle space that had the ability to integrate human assistance with built-in artificial intelligence. Gondal realized that while people were adopting wearable technology solutions for healthy living, there was still a lack of awareness and an air of hesitancy about the usefulness of and need for wearable devices in India. Gondal's dilemma: whether to continue GOQii's positioning as "wearable technology with personalized coaching" and aggressively expand globally, or consolidate and broaden his present offering by embracing the customer more fully and focusing on the "customer healthcare journey" in India. Case B picks up from October 2016, by which time GOQii had consolidated and broadened its offering by focusing on the "customer journey" in India. It had successfully on-boarded different service providers such as doctors, a diagnostic center chain, a hospital chain, sports and grocery stores and Axis Bank (for payments) on their platform, thus providing a complete health ecosystem to the GOQii user. By the second quarter of 2016, GOQii had achieved the number one spot in the Indian wearables market. The immediate decision that GOQii core team need to make is whether they should tie up with multiple insurance providers or explore the possibility of partnering with a reinsurer to complete the entire health spectrum services offering on their data platform.

The two cases allow for an in-depth discussion on the key role of a business model in ensuring the competitive advantage and sustained success of a business venture.

Learning objective:
The cases are structured around the following teaching/ learning objectives: · To identify the various traits of an entrepreneur · To identify the forces on which an entrepreneurial opportunity is dependent. · To appreciate the market attractiveness and future of wearable technology. · To understand the importance of a customer journey and its ability to provide competitive advantage to a brand. · To understand the key role of the choice of business model in ensuring the competitive advantage

CasesMehrotra, Sonia;  Pereira, Arun. "GOQii: Envisioning a New Fitness Future (A)", 2017Read Description >Close >Discipline: Entrepreneurship
Industry: Apparel accessories, Fitness, Fitness equipment
Length: 14p
Subjects covered: Artificial intelligence; Entrepreneurship; Health care; Technology
Publication Date: December 31, 2016
 
Description: 
Gondal, a serial entrepreneur, was supported by top technology experts in GOQii's angel round of funding. Case A details GOQii's journey from its incorporation in 2014 until April 2016. It describes GOQii's product-service offering of wearable fitness band technology supplemented with remote personalized coaching, its launch in the Indian market, and its emergence as a pioneer of a new category of product in the health and lifestyle space that had the ability to integrate human assistance with built-in artificial intelligence. Gondal realized that while people were adopting wearable technology solutions for healthy living, there was still a lack of awareness and an air of hesitancy about the usefulness of and need for wearable devices in India. Gondal's dilemma: whether to continue GOQii's positioning as "wearable technology with personalized coaching" and aggressively expand globally, or consolidate and broaden his present offering by embracing the customer more fully and focusing on the "customer healthcare journey" in India. Case B picks up from October 2016, by which time GOQii had consolidated and broadened its offering by focusing on the "customer journey" in India. It had successfully on-boarded different service providers such as doctors, a diagnostic center chain, a hospital chain, sports and grocery stores and Axis Bank (for payments) on their platform, thus providing a complete health ecosystem to the GOQii user. By the second quarter of 2016, GOQii had achieved the number one spot in the Indian wearables market. The immediate decision that GOQii core team need to make is whether they should tie up with multiple insurance providers or explore the possibility of partnering with a reinsurer to complete the entire health spectrum services offering on their data platform. The two cases allow for an in-depth discussion on the key role of a business model in ensuring the competitive advantage and sustained success of a business venture.

Learning objective:
The cases are structured around the following teaching/ learning objectives: · To identify the various traits of an entrepreneur · To identify the forces on which an entrepreneurial opportunity is dependent. · To appreciate the market attractiveness and future of wearable technology. · To understand the importance of a customer journey and its ability to provide competitive advantage to a brand. · To understand the key role of the choice of business model in ensuring the competitive advantage

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