CasesChakrabarti, Rajesh;  Sujlana, Digvijay Singh . "SREI Sahaj E-Village (A)", 2017Read Description >Close >Discipline: Service Management
Length: 22 pages
Subjects covered: Business model innovation; Service management
Publication Date: December 22, 2016

Description: 
Sahaj e-Village Limited, an initiative of SREI Infrastructure Finance Ltd, hoped to answer the need of the Indian government's National e-Governance Plan (NeGP) to set up 100,000 Common Service Centres (CSCs) across rural India in 2006. This figure was subsequently revised to 250,000 CSCs in 2009. Sahaj aimed to bridge the digital divide between urban and rural India and set up one of the largest brick and mortar --and human --networks in rural India. With close to 27,000 IT-backed centers in villages with a population of less than 10,000 and 50 critical services in the domains of microinsurance, education, utility and government-to-citizen (G2C) services to over 300,000,000 rural people, Sahaj e-Village was literally taking urban services to the remotest nooks of rural India. Sahaj CSCs would provide rural consumers with direct access to modern, state-of-the-art technological facilities and computer education, thus dovetailing with its long-term plans of providing Internet connectivity across rural India. Case A, set in July 2010, presents the tough challenge that the top management at Sahaj e-Village Ltd had on its hands. It was serving a virtually untouched rural market through a greenfield project with a jittery workforce in place and was justifiably concerned about the viability and sustainability of the business.

Learning objective: 
The case introduces the reader to the fiduciary concerns of social enterprises and the restrictions faced by government-led enterprises when they plan to scale up of their organizations. Students are led to analyze organized and unorganized employment opportunities and challenges. The case lets students analyze and understand the:
  1. Dynamics of the social networking market
  2. e-Village business model and
  3. Importance of an appropriate business model in the rural social entrepreneurship space.


CasesChakrabarti, Rajesh;  Sujlana, Digvijay Singh . "SREI Sahaj E-Village (A)", 2017Read Description >Close >Discipline: Service Management
Length: 22 pages
Subjects covered: Business model innovation; Service management
Publication Date: December 22, 2016

Description: 
Sahaj e-Village Limited, an initiative of SREI Infrastructure Finance Ltd, hoped to answer the need of the Indian government's National e-Governance Plan (NeGP) to set up 100,000 Common Service Centres (CSCs) across rural India in 2006. This figure was subsequently revised to 250,000 CSCs in 2009. Sahaj aimed to bridge the digital divide between urban and rural India and set up one of the largest brick and mortar --and human --networks in rural India. With close to 27,000 IT-backed centers in villages with a population of less than 10,000 and 50 critical services in the domains of microinsurance, education, utility and government-to-citizen (G2C) services to over 300,000,000 rural people, Sahaj e-Village was literally taking urban services to the remotest nooks of rural India. Sahaj CSCs would provide rural consumers with direct access to modern, state-of-the-art technological facilities and computer education, thus dovetailing with its long-term plans of providing Internet connectivity across rural India. Case A, set in July 2010, presents the tough challenge that the top management at Sahaj e-Village Ltd had on its hands. It was serving a virtually untouched rural market through a greenfield project with a jittery workforce in place and was justifiably concerned about the viability and sustainability of the business.

Learning objective: 
The case introduces the reader to the fiduciary concerns of social enterprises and the restrictions faced by government-led enterprises when they plan to scale up of their organizations. Students are led to analyze organized and unorganized employment opportunities and challenges. The case lets students analyze and understand the:
  1. Dynamics of the social networking market
  2. e-Village business model and
  3. Importance of an appropriate business model in the rural social entrepreneurship space.


CasesChakrabarti, Rajesh;  Sujlana, Digvijay Singh . "SREI Sahaj E-Village (B)", 2017Read Description >Close >Discipline: Service Management
Length: 14 pages
Subjects covered: Business model innovation; Service management
Publication Date: December 22, 2016

Description: 
Sahaj e-Village Limited, an initiative of SREI Infrastructure Finance Ltd, hoped to answer the need of the Indian government's National e-Governance Plan (NeGP) to set up 100,000 Common Service Centres (CSCs) across rural India in 2006. This figure was subsequently revised to 250,000 CSCs in 2009. Sahaj aimed to bridge the digital divide between urban and rural India and set up one of the largest brick and mortar --and human --networks in rural India. With close to 27,000 IT-backed centers in villages with a population of less than 10,000 and 50 critical services in the domains of microinsurance, education, utility and government-to-citizen (G2C) services to over 300,000,000 rural people, Sahaj e-Village was literally taking urban services to the remotest nooks of rural India. Sahaj CSCs would provide rural consumers with direct access to modern, state-of-the-art technological facilities and computer education, thus dovetailing with its long-term plans of providing Internet connectivity across rural India. Case B moves ahead from the challenge described in Case A and outlines Sahaj's transformation process. Starting August 2010, Sahaj guided its troops through an ideological transformation that would take the organization from being primarily a government service provider to an enterprising business entity capable of fending for itself. In order to achieve this goal, Sahaj took the important first step of understanding the intricacies and dynamics of the relationships among the various stakeholders involved in the project. This, in a sense, proved to be a breakthrough in the organization's transformation process.

Learning objective: 
The case introduces the reader to the fiduciary concerns of social enterprises and the restrictions faced by government-led enterprises when they plan to scale up of their organizations. Students are led to analyze organized and unorganized employment opportunities and challenges. The case lets students analyze and understand the:
  1. Dynamics of the social networking market
  2. e-Village business model and
  3. Importance of an appropriate business model in the rural social entrepreneurship space.


CasesSingh, Davinder;  Sahu, Anuj . "Forbes Technosys Limited (B): Bill Payment Kiosk Business", 2017Read Description >Close >Issues: business model, mobile, billing
Disciplines:  General Management/Strategy
Industries: Other Services
Setting: India, Medium, 2010
Length: 6 pages (4 pages of text)
Intended Audience: MBA/Postgraduate
Publication Date: December 19, 2016

Abstract:
In May 2010, Forbes Technosys Limited (FTL) was not doing well. After more than a year, the company’s bill payment kiosk business was losing money and no longer seemed viable. The time had come to re-evaluate all aspects of this business line and make decisions regarding FTL’s future course of action. Accordingly, FTL’s chief executive officer proposed an idea regarding prepaid mobile recharges using the existing bill payment kiosks, along with a new technology platform for this purpose. He hoped that handheld terminals could be used by retail-level franchisees to sell recharges to prepaid mobile users. Essentially, FTL had three options: should the company persist with or pivot the service provider business model, or “perish” the complete solution provider idea entirely and revert to being a product manufacturer? Whichever strategy FTL chose, it would have to limit and balance both operating and capital expenses. Use with 9B16M221

Learning Objective:
This case can be used during a course on strategic innovation management, which is usually scheduled in the second half of an MBA/postgraduate program or executive MBA program. It can be used to teach students about the following concepts:
  • Making strategic choices about business models, especially the choice between being a service provider and a product manufacturer while pursuing innovation.
  • Making decisions as to whether to persist, pivot, or perish in a particular business model while pursuing new business opportunities.




CasesSingh, Davinder;  Sahu, Anuj . "Forbes Technosys Limited (A): Bill Payment Kiosk Business", 2017Read Description >Close >Issues: business model, mobile, billing
Disciplines:  General Management/Strategy
Industries: Other Services
Setting: India, Medium, 2010
Length: 9 pages (7 pages of text)
Intended Audience: MBA/Postgraduate
Publication Date: December 19, 2016

Abstract:
In May 2010, Forbes Technosys Limited (FTL) was not doing well. After more than a year, the company’s bill payment kiosk business was losing money and no longer seemed viable. The time had come to re-evaluate all aspects of this business line and make decisions regarding FTL’s future course of action. Accordingly, FTL’s chief executive officer proposed an idea regarding prepaid mobile recharges using the existing bill payment kiosks, along with a new technology platform for this purpose. He hoped that handheld terminals could be used by retail-level franchisees to sell recharges to prepaid mobile users. Essentially, FTL had three options: should the company persist with or pivot the service provider business model, or “perish” the complete solution provider idea entirely and revert to being a product manufacturer? Whichever strategy FTL chose, it would have to limit and balance both operating and capital expenses.

Learning Objective:
This case can be used during a course on strategic innovation management, which is usually scheduled in the second half of an MBA/postgraduate program or executive MBA program. It can be used to teach students about the following concepts:
  • Making strategic choices about business models, especially the choice between being a service provider and a product manufacturer while pursuing innovation
  • Making decisions as to whether to persist, pivot, or perish in a particular business model while pursuing new business opportunities


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