Published Papers

The School’s research output in the last decade has been both significant and considerable, as testified by our AACSB accreditation in 2011. We take great pride in the fact that our faculty have contributed more than 150 articles to reputed academic and practitioner journals.

In the past few years, ISB faculty members have published over 60 papers in top-tier journals. Our faculty have received numerous coveted research grants awarded by premier academic institutions, research centres, corporate houses and reputed foundations such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Ford Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, WWF, McCombs School of Business, UT-Austin and others. These awards attest to the scope, depth and impact of the research conducted at the ISB.

Published PapersBatra, Rishtee Kumar., Ghoshal, Tanuka. (Forthcoming) "Fill Up Your Senses: A Theory of Self-Worth Restoration through High Intensity Sensory Consumption", Journal of Consumer ResearchCentre for Emerging Markets SolutionsRead Abstract >Close >It is well known that individuals engage in reactive consumption to address self-discrepancy and self-threat and that this consumption may be either symbolically related to the nature of the threat or may occur in an unrelated domain. This research proposes a theory for self-worth restoration through the consumption of high intensity sensory stimuli. Four studies demonstrate that not only do individuals facing self-threat prefer high intensity sensory consumption (HISC) but also this consumption restores their self-worth. This propensity for HISC is negated after individuals are allowed to engage in additional self-affirmation tasks. The findings are documented in both the visual domain (as evidenced by a preference for more intense and saturated colors) and the auditory domain (as evidenced by a preference for louder audio levels). The consumption of high intensity sensory stimuli elevates individuals’ arousal levels, which in turn minimizes rumination on thoughts related to the threat and thus restores one’s self-worth. The distractive nature of HISC and its subsequent impact on self-worth restoration is shown to operate regardless of the valence of the sensory consumption. Finally, the propensity for HISC is negated after individuals experience an arousal-elevating threat, providing additional support for the underlying process.

Published PapersAwate, Snehal., Ajwani, Raji.,Ajith, V. (Forthcoming) "Catch-up as a survival strategy in the solar power industry", Journal of International Management, ForthcomingCentre for Emerging Markets Solutions
Published PapersParuchuri, Srikanth., Awate, Snehal. (2017) "Organisational knowledge networks and local search: the role of intra-organisational inventor networks", Strategic Management Journal , 38 (3), 657-675Centre for Emerging Markets Solutions
Published PapersAwate, Snehal., Mudambi, Ram. (Forthcoming) "On the geography of emerging industry technological networks: the breadth and depth of patented innovations", Journal of Economic Geography, ForthcomingCentre for Emerging Markets Solutions
Published PapersJain, Tarun., Sood, Ashima. (2017) "How does relationship-based governance accommodate new entrants? Evidence from the cycle rickshaw rental market", Journal of Institutional Economics, 13 (3)Read Abstract >Close >Urban informal self-employment activities are known to be an important destination for rural-to-urban migrants engaged in multilocational livelihood strategies. Yet, the literature suggests that access to working capital required for these occupations may be a significant barrier for temporary migrants. This paper addresses this puzzle using data from a primary field study of the cycle rickshaw rental market in a central Indian city. Employing a multi-dimensional measure of migration and analysing both the driver and the owner-contractor sides of the cycle rickshaw rental market, we argue that informal rental markets may be critical to overcoming credit access issues for migrants.

  • <
  • Page 2 of 111
  • >