Case, Simulation & Pedagogy

The ISB has constantly endeavoured to facilitate teaching excellence and upgrade pedagogy by bringing real-world knowledge into the classroom. One of the important ways it achieves this is through the development of business cases and simulations that enrich understanding of real-life management challenges at every level. In this pursuit, we have partnered with the Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario (Ivey), Canada to develop and promote high-quality case studies specific to India and the emerging markets with the support of ISB faculty as well as faculty from other leading B-schools worldwide.

CasesNavneet Bhatnagar, Kavil Ramachandran, Andrea Calabro, Sougata Ray. "Merck, Darmstadt: Sustaining Legacy Beyond 350 Years", 2019Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: General Management
Industry: Chemicals,Advanced materials,Pharmaceuticals
Length: 30p
Subjects covered: Organizational values, Succession issues, Leadership, Stewardship, Corporate governance, Organizational management, Family businesses, Strategy
Publication Date: October 22, 2018
 
Description: 
This case is about the business, governance and leadership transformation of Merck - a 13th generation, family-owned, German multinational group operating in the pharmaceuticals, performance materials and life science industries. Established in 1668 as a pharmacy in Darmstadt, Germany, Merck ventured into the manufacturing of pharmaceuticals and specialty chemicals in 1827. Successfully overcoming several business and family challenges, it continued to grow. By 2017, Merck had a legacy of nearly 350 years of successful business operations, a presence in 66 countries and about 52,000 employees on its rolls. In 2017, Merck was led by Dr. Frank Stangenberg-Haverkamp (69), an 11th generation member who was the Chairman of the executive board and the family board of E. Merck KG (the group's holding company). With his 70th birthday approaching, Frank wanted to identify an able successor who could help him build the group for the next 100 years and take the Merck legacy forward.

Learning objective:
The case is intended to help the participants understand the essential building blocks of a long-lasting, multi-generational family business and specifically comprehend the role played by
(i) family values,
(ii) strategic vision, and
(iii) the owner family's adherence to their mission in transforming a family business into a long-lasting institution. This case is appropriate for MBA and Executive education programs, in courses like, Family Business Management, Governance and Strategy.

CasesS. Ramnarayan, Sunita Mehta. "Creating and Sustaining a Social Enterprise: The Vittala Story", 2019Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Social Enterprise
Industry: Health care services
Length: 17p
Subjects covered: Organizational behavior, Organizational values, Innovation, Leadership, Social enterprise, Organizational culture, Family businesses, Social responsibility
Publication Date: October 1, 2018
 
Description: 
Vittala International Institute of Ophthalmology (Vittala), a not-for-profit orgnization was involved in providing free/highly subsidized eye care to the rural and the economically underprivileged population in the state of Karnataka, India. The case describes the challenges faced by the founder and his family in building the state-of-the-art institution and sustaining it through its difficult initial years. They had to build awareness of avoidable blindness, make eye care accessible and affordable, and develop the right networks and alliances, all within limited resources. Unlike certain eye care issues such as cataract, Vittala focused on retinal eye care problems that required periodic monitoring and treatment. Diagnosis required sophisticated and expensive equipment, which had to be made available in far-flung small towns and villages, and that posed difficulties. To address the challenges, the organization and its founders executed pioneering innovations in organizational arrangements and processes. The case closes with the dilemma facing Krishna, Director of Vittala, which was to examine how the social enterprise could enhance the revenue streams to increase Vittala's reach in providing eye to the economically disadvantaged citizens. He needs to consider issues like creating the right balance of paying and non-paying patients to ensure sustainable operations, consistent quality of care, keeping technology updated, and attracting and retaining medical staff with right skills and values. The case is significant as it highlights what is required to make healthcare accessible and affordable to the poor, and how policy measures can be executed at the ground level through appropriate organizing efforts. It describes how the founder inculcated a system of values to keep the family members together, thus contributing to the effectiveness and sustainability of the social enterprise.

Learning objective:
To understand the factors influencing the setting up of a not-for-profit enterprise in the health care sector and exposing the students to the realities of present system of health care in India; To explore the process and organizing innovations required to deliver affordable eye care to rural areas; To emphasize the importance of aligning multiple stakeholders to build effective and sustainable operations; To emphasize the importance of values in family run organizations to build togetherness.

CasesVikram Kuriyan, Soumithri Mamudipudi, Geetika Shah, Bitan Chakraborty. "Thomas Cook India: Potential Unleashed - A Journey to Value Creation", 2019Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Finance
Industry: Finance
Length: 21p
Subjects covered: Finance, General Management, Strategy
Publication Date: October 24, 2018
 
Description: 
The case gives students an opportunity to analyze the ways in which the company's management uses Prem Watsa's value investment philosophy to guide its decisions, both in its core business and in its acquisitions. The case also gives students lessons the value investment philosophy offers to investors and managers of firms. The travel industry is beset by structural changes and new paradigms and owners have to respond to the changing environment.

Learning objective:
The changing fortunes of TCI are most apparent in the increase in its share price after making several acquisitions. The case gives students an opportunity to analyze the ways in which the company's management uses Prem Watsa's value investment philosophy to guide its decisions, both in its core business and in its acquisitions. The case also gives students an idea of how travel companies in India have had to adapt to new paradigms and what lessons the value investment philosophy offers.

CasesRuppal Walia Sharma, Mridula S. Mishra. "Greenco Enterprises India Pvt. Ltd.: Market Strategy for Frozen Snacks", 2019Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Marketing,  Entrepreneurship,  International
Industry: Retail Trade
Length: 11p
Subjects covered: Marketing,  Entrepreneurship,  International
Publication Date: November 16, 2018
 
Description: 
In November 2016, the two co-founders of the Delhi-based Greenco Enterprises India Pvt. Ltd. were getting ready to launch a range of frozen snacks in the competitive Indian market. Their strategy was to penetrate the already established non-vegetarian frozen snacks market with fast-moving popular products and grow the vegetarian frozen snacks market with differentiated offerings. As the January 2017 launch date approached, they had to get their pricing and distribution strategy in place. For a new brand with a limited budget, securing shelf space was a challenge. The two founders wondered whether the company should focus all of its efforts on building a retail brand in the business-to-consumer segment, or whether it should consider institutional sales in the business-to-business space. How could the initial investment and running costs be balanced with the need to stay competitive in the market?

Learning objective:
This case is best suited to an undergraduate or graduate marketing management course to discuss different aspects of a strategy for launching a new brand. It can also be used in a management course to discuss pricing and distribution channels. Working through the case will give students the opportunity to
  • identify the issues involved in developing a strategy to launch a new brand;
  • determine various pricing strategies for entering a competitive market and recommend one that is most appropriate; and
  • discuss how to manage the distribution challenges faced by a new brand.


CasesShuchi Srinivasan, Akshay Milap, Pearl Malhotra, Harsh Dadhich, Ajay Kathuria. "Lemon Tree Hotels: Opening Doors for Everyone", 2019Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: General Management/Strategy, International
Industry: Other Services
Length: 18p
Subjects covered: sustainability, diversity, inclusion, strategy
Publication Date: November 28, 2018
 
Description: 
On January 1, 2017, the head of sustainability initiatives at Lemon Tree Hotels (Lemon Tree) in India reflected on the future of the company’s inclusion and diversity initiative. Since the inception of the initiative in 2007, Lemon Tree had become the largest employer of persons with disabilities in the Indian hospitality industry. In 2014, Lemon Tree had set itself an ambitious target of increasing the share of opportunity-deprived individuals, which included mainly persons with disabilities, to 45 per cent of its workforce by the end of financial year 2025.

To remain on course to achieve this goal, the head of sustainability initiatives needed to address key areas of concern in expanding the initiative beyond its current level. For example, where would the company source and recruit persons with disabilities, what costs would be involved, and what specific types of disability would the initiative need to open itself to? While expanding the initiative, how would Lemon Tree preserve its sustainability framework, which was based on the three pillars of the triple bottom line: profit, planet, and people? Should the company instead pursue deeper integration and more gradual growth, which would allow it to consolidate its learning thus far, but would require deeper analysis of training needs and delivery? The head of sustainability initiatives felt the need to discuss these options with the senior leadership team and plan the company’s approach to best operationally and culturally integrate persons with disabilities and other opportunity-deprived individuals into its workforce.

Learning objective:
This case is best suited for management students at the postgraduate level. We recommend using the case in a strategic management, human resource management, or entrepreneurship course. Depending on the course, the case can focus on sustainability and issues of corporate social responsibility, such as integrating sustainability initiatives into business strategy; human resource management, including the management of persons with disabilities; or entrepreneurship, including building organizations that focus on a triple bottom line. After reading and analyzing the case study, students should be able to do the following:
  • Evaluate whether a for-profit organization can profitably operate socially proactive initiatives as part of its business model.
  • Devise various strategies for shifting from tokenism to creating an inclusive workforce and systematically building organizational capabilities toward mainstreaming persons with disabilities.
  • Provide a reasonable course of action that balances factual, emotional, and ethical premises.
  • Understand the role and impact of the leader's vision in framing future strategies.

     


CasesKuriyan, Vikram; Ved, Unnati; Shah, Geetika. "Azim Premji Trust: The Endowment Model in An Emerging Market", 2018Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Finance
Industry: Asset management
Length: 27p
Subjects covered: Asset management; Investment management; Philanthropies; Portfolio management; Trusts
Publication Date: December 28, 2017
 
Description: 
The Azim Premji Trust, among the largest philanthropic trusts in India, had its origins in 2001, when Azim Premji transferred Wipro shares worth US$ 125 million to the trust. As of March 31, 2017, the trust had a corpus fund of US$ 9 billion. The trust's goal was to support Premji's philanthropic pursuits through two organizations -- the Azim Premji Foundation and Azim Premji Philanthropic Initiatives. Both beneficiaries had distinct, ambitious philanthropic objectives that required large, ongoing funding. The trust's Chief Endowment Officer, K. R. Lakshminarayana, had been given the responsibility of planning the future of one of India's first endowments. The endowment was tasked with maximizing total return over a long horizon. Therefore, the trust had deliberately been created as a taxable entity to allow it the freedom to make large investments in equities and alternatives. The case describes the challenges Lakshminarayana, widely known as Lan, faced in arriving at a strategic asset allocation model in an emerging market with limited investment talent and investment firms and constraints on the trust's ability to invest outside India.

Learning objective:
  1. Identify and describe an exhaustive list of investment philosophies and investment opportunities available to the Azim Premji Trust.
  2. Identify and describe any changes in the ways through which the Azim Premji Trust invests as institutions and investment opportunities improve in India.


Cases. "Clubb International: Revisiting the Marketing Strategy", 2018Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Marketing,  Entrepreneurship
Industry: Retail Trade
Length: 15p
Subjects covered: marketing strategy, product innovation, family business
Publication Date: February 05, 2018
 
Description: 
Clubb International Private Limited (Clubb) was a 26-year-old travel goods and accessories firm based in Kolkata, India. The owner believed in a complete ownership model. The firm had come a long way since its beginning and now had close to 200 product offerings. In March 2017, the owner’s son (the second-generation director of Clubb) felt it was time to scale up the business and acquire a leadership position in the market. Clubb had at its core a legacy of innovation, quality, and a bootstrapping philosophy, but it might not be conducive to the new strategic vision. For the road ahead, the company needed a professional and streamlined product and retail strategy. Could the desired scale of operations be achieved with the complete ownership model and mantra of no advertising?

Learning objective:
The case can be taught as part of a foundation course in marketing in a postgraduate management program or used to illustrate strategy formulation in a second-year strategic marketing course. Discussion of the case gives students the opportunity to do the following:
  1. Understand how an entrepreneur translates his vision into his firm's business philosophy.
  2. Understand how macro environmental factors and a competitive landscape determine the context that strongly affects a company's business strategy.
  3. Comprehend how a firm's overall strategy is translated into its marketing strategy.
  4. Carry out a financial analysis to evaluate the company's business performance.
  5. Work toward conceptualizing a marketing plan for achieving the firm's future goals.
     


CasesPiyush Kumar; Sonia Mehrotra; Geetika Shah. "Be Well Hospitals - Branding A Mid-Tier Service in A Two-Tier Market", 2018Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Service Management
Industry: Hospitals
Length: 14p
Subjects covered: Brand positioning; Branding; Marketing; Service management
Publication Date: July 11, 2017
 
Description: 
Be Well Hospitals - a multi-specialty secondary healthcare chain of hospitals is set up in the suburbs, industrial towns and district headquarters of the South Indian state of Tamil Nadu. The hospital chain co-founded by Dr. C.J.Vetrievel in 2011, fulfills the need of quality healthcare services in secondary healthcare market segment. They provide access to high-quality primary and secondary healthcare services at affordable price to the semi-urban and rural population through their chain of multi-specialty hospitals. In the four and half years, since its founding, Be Well has set up eight hospitals with a combined capacity of more than 280 beds and has treated close to 500,000 patients. The case describes Be Well's operations and the marketing initiatives it deployed to increase the adoption of its service concept in a two -tiered market. it provides information about the content of Be Well's past advertising communications and the media choices it made to build its brand. The management is grappling with the dilemma of brand building and educating potential customers about the high quality of care available at Be Well in a format that had a smaller footprint than its big city rivals. A complicating factor is creating a three-tier market with the limited resources in a setting where the customers are used to a two-tier service structure. They face a resource allocation challenge with regard to the mix of media-based and non-media based communication platforms. The management needs to decided on the choice of service attributes or dimensions around which the Be Well brand to be built and whether to focus on local branding of each hospital or develop a unified and common brand across all its facilities in the state.

Learning objective:
Understanding consumer's decision process to choose between private versus public healthcare institutions and among primary, secondary and tertiary institutions; Challenge of building a pioneering brand by a private enterprise in the secondary healthcare category;Choosing the appropriate marketing mix and operational instruments to be build the category and position the brand; Challenges of sustaining a pioneering brand over the long run in the face of the competition from tertiary care centers.

CasesSivakumar Alur; Durgaprasad M; Sulagna Mukherjee; U Srinivasa Rangan. "Mysore Ghee Stores: Expansion Strategy for Clarified Butter Business", 2018Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >

Discipline: Strategy
Industry: Agribusiness
Length: 17p
Subjects covered: Brand positioning; Expansion; Five forces; Strategic positioning; Strategy
Publication Date: March 01, 2018
 
Description: 
Mysore Ghee Store (MGS) produced and marketed ghee (clarified butter) in the city of Hyderabad in India. Most of its ghee sales were B2B to businesses like restaurants and sweetmeat makers that used it for food preparation. Decreasing B2B market margins and increased packed ghee sales to end users through the retail market prompted Satish Kumar, MGS's current owner, to enter the B2C market. He tied up with More (pronounced `moray'), a national retail chain for supplying packed ghee in October 2013. MGS's packed ghee was also made available across multiple retail channels ranging from independent mom and pop stores to regional/local chains' retail outlets and e-retailers. Packed MGS ghee sales through the various retail channels were somewhat encouraging. In April 2016, MGS was looking at two sets of issues. The first was how to proceed with the brand building driven marketing communication effort. The second was to rethink the strategic options in front of MGS and assess the need for and viability of a new strategic direction for the company.

Learning objective:

This case can be used in undergraduate, graduate, and executive education programs. It is best suited for a strategy or an entrepreneurship course in addition to integrated marketing communication course. Executive education programs on marketing aimed at marketing executives in the fast moving consumer goods companies could be another place for the use of this case. Porter's 5 forces model, strategy execution and positioning can be effectively discussed in this case.



CasesVaidyanathan Krishnamurthy; Catherine Xavier. "Air India: Maharaja in Debt Trap", 2018Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >

Discipline: Finance
Industry: Airlines
Length: 17p
Subjects covered: Debt management; Debts; Financing; Long term financing; Restructuring; Turnaround strategies; Turnarounds
Publication Date: Feb 01, 2018
 
Description: 
In the year 2016, after more than a decade of loss-making, Air India posted an operating profit of INR 1.05 billion. Over the years, Air India's greatest problem has been its crippling debt. At the end of fiscal 2014-15, the airline had a total debt of INR 513.67 billion. While the airline managed to phase out more than INR 50 billion of debt from its books during the year 2015-16, its total debt still stood at INR 460 billion. In order to facilitate the revival of Air India, Ashwani Lohani, known as the "turnaround man", was appointed Chairman and Managing Director of Air India. As Lohani piloted Air India towards revival, efforts were being made to convert INR 100 billion of Air India's debt into equity, a move that would substantially reduce its interest burden and give banks a major say in its functioning. Lohani was in talks with banks and investors who could play a critical role in Air India's debt restructuring. Lohani mulled over the various options related to debt restructuring. It remained to be seen whether Lohani's image as the "turnaround man" coupled with Air India's operating profits would increase investor confidence and help Air India deal with its debt burden. While Air India's modest operating profit was good news, it remained to be seen if it could provide relief to the sick airline's actual financials. It also remained to be seen whether Lohani's attempts at improving employee relations with the organization and the operational changes he was introducing to Air India could help turn the tide for the ailing airline. As of July, 2017, two questions remained: Had Air India really turned the corner under Lohani's leadership? Could Air India's short-term progress help it to overcome the huge debt that had become the "elephant in the room"?

Learning objective:

  1. Analyze various debt restructuring methods and their effects on corporate control and management.
  2. Analyze and evaluate the effect of corporate restructuring on equity and debt.
  3. Gain a nuanced understanding of turnaround management during debt restructuring.
  4. Illustrate and analyze strategic issues faced by managers and investors during debt restructuring. The case is suitable for MBA and Executive MBA students.

 



Cases. "Eggscellence: SKM Egg Products Export (India) Limited", 2018Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Entrepreneurship, International, Marketing
Industry: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting
Length: 12p
Subjects covered:  global marketing strategy, Indian SME, small and medium enterprises, turn around, sustaining value
Publication Date: May 24, 2018
 
Description: 
SKM Egg Products Export (India) Limited (SKM) manufactured processed egg products, including egg powder and liquid egg, which it exported to advanced international markets. The company had gone through phases of turnaround, countering challenges and a severe debt overload. In 2016, it had overseas subsidiaries in Japan, the Netherlands, and Russia. The chief executive officer had promoted SKM’s use of technology, quality processes, and accreditations to move up the value chain. India was the third-largest egg producer in the world, and he saw India’s specific advantages of scale and a mature eco-system in egg production, collection, feed, and poultry as logical elements for selecting an export-led growth strategy. He was planning another turnaround to counter a 20 per cent revenue hit that his top line had suffered in 2016–17 because of the impact of the 2015 avian flu epidemic in the United States and the resulting drop in global egg-product consumption and prices. His mission was to make SKM a ₹7.5 billion company by 2022. What actions should the company take regarding genetically modified crops? How should it approach opportunities to import feed material ingredients, eggs, and egg products from other source countries? Should it consolidate its overseas operations and leverage the domestic market? If so, how?

Learning objective:
This case can be used in undergraduate or graduate courses on international marketing, international business, and emerging markets, particularly in units on emerging-market companies becoming globally competitive. After working through the case and assignment questions, students will be able to do the following:
  • Describe how an emerging-market company can succeed as a global player by leveraging its first-mover advantage as well as costs and other advantages of an emerging economy.
  • Explain the importance of including the development of sustainable capabilities in technology, quality processes, product development, and accreditation as part of a business model in relation to global competitiveness.
  • Describe the use of public–private partnerships in greenfield projects.
  • Describe how an emerging-market company can use strategic alliance as a global market entry strategy.
  • Outline the advantages of operating a business with concern for the environment and a triple bottom line.
  • Identify future opportunities and recommend suitable growth strategies for an emerging-market company such as SKM.

     


CasesDevalkar, Sripad K., Deo, Sarang., Vaidya, Akshay.,Gokhale, Meghana. "ATMYDOORSTEPS.COM: BREAKING GROUND IN THE ONLINE GROCERY MARKET IN INDIA", ISB Case Collection distributed through HBS Publishing, Forthcoming
CasesNupur Pavan Bang, Kavil Ramachandran. "Dodla's Dilemma", 2018Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >

Discipline: General Management
Length: 13p
Subjects covered: Succession issues, Stewardship, Corporate governance, Leadership & Managing people, Family businesses, Family-owned businesses
Publication Date: May 01, 2018
 
Description: 
D. Sunil Reddy established Dodla Dairy in 1995 in Nellore district of the southern Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. An industrial engineer from Mangalore University, Sunil set up Dodla as a greenfield company at the age of 27 with seed money provided by his father. He was inspired by his grandparents and father to help those in need grow and flourish and by Mahatma Gandhi's call to "reach out to rural India". The company had grown well over the years. In fiscal 2015-16, it achieved an annual turnover of over INR 11 billion and aimed to touch INR 25 billion in revenues by 2020. It had a workforce of more than 2,000 employees, procured about a million liters of milk per day from 250,000 milk producers, and processed and sold milk and milk products at 67 locations in nine states in India. In 2011, Private equity fund Proterra invested INR 1.1 billion in Dodla, bringing down the family's shareholding from 100% to 76.34% (it would later go down to 72.3%). Sunil knew that if the company had to move to the next orbit, both in terms of size (revenues, assets and market share) and professionalization, certain organizational changes would be necessary. He wondered what these changes would be and who would make them. How could he better prepare himself and the company for the future? How would the company move from being a family-owned enterprise to a professionally run, sustainable organization? Would one of his daughters join the organization, bringing freshness to the company while providing continuity in terms of family values? Would the company be run by an outsider? "Who after me?", thought Sunil. He often wondered whether the brand "Dodla" and the company he had founded would sustain beyond himself. While he continued his efforts to increase capacity, expand and capture more market share, he kept asking himself, "What next" and "How do I build a legacy?

Learning objective:

The case takes students through the journey of an entrepreneur who built a very successful company and has reached a stage in the company's growth and his own life where he is uncertain what future course to take. Students should be able to discuss the dilemmas faced by the founder, Sunil Dodla, and come up with options that are available to him to tackle them.



CasesNavneet Bhatnagar, Kavil Ramachandran. "Touchdown Footwear on a Slippery Slope", 2018Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >

Discipline: General Management
Length: 11p
Subjects covered: Professionalism, Succession issues, Emerging markets, Stewardship, Corporate governance, Organizational management, Leadership & Managing people, Family businesses
Publication Date: May 10, 2018
 
Description: 
This case is based on the professionalization and governance challenges faced by Touchdown Footwear Limited (TFL), a mid-sized Indian footwear manufacturing family business. TFL was set up in 1965 in the southern Indian city of Mangalore by three brothers, Ramnath, Krishna and Ganesh Pai who had inherited their father's rubber trading business. Initially, TFL made flip-flops and catered to the local market. Over the years, it had expanded the product portfolio to include school shoes and other non-leather footwear. By 2016 TFL had a pan-India presence with some exports to African markets. In the early years, the three brothers managed all the functions of the business. When the next generation came of age and joined the firm in the 1970s and '80s, they took up various roles based largely on business exigencies. By 2016, TFL had a turnover of INR 16.19 billion but lacked professional management and a clear strategy. In the absence of an appropriate structure, systems and processes, decision-making was ad hoc. Inefficiencies and wastage were evident across the organization, and working capital was under severe strain. The firm suffered from a deficit of governance at both the family and business systems. The lack of clear policies and processes delayed many crucial decisions. Earlier attempts to professionalize the business had failed to achieve the desired results as family members lacked clear policies to follow and were unable to change their mindset. Furthermore, when the fourth generation began to enter the business, there were questions about their level of commitment and discipline. TFL required transitional change on multiple fronts to sustain the business but there was lack of clarity on the roadmap for the future.

Learning objective:

The case aims to help the participants recognize and effectively manage the challenges of professionalization and governance that a small family business faces during the process of growth and transition into a larger organization. This case serves as a tool for understanding and mapping the transition needed on three dimensions of - (1) Strategy, (2) Professionalization, and (3) Family Governance, as a family business crosses the initial threshold of growth in its life cycle.



CasesSubramaniam Ramnarayan, Sunita Mehta. "Implementing Fortis Operating System (A) & (B)", 2018Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Organizational Behaviour/Leadership
Industry: Health Care Services
Length: 16p
Subjects covered: change management, organizational change, health care management, leadership
Publication Date: June 29, 2018
 
Description: 
This case series allows students to examine the dynamics of an organization-wide operating system change that was implemented over a decade from 2007 to 2017. The change was initially introduced at Fortis Healthcare Limited in a single hospital and later successfully scaled up to multiple locations. The system worked well for some years before it fell victim to gradual degeneration and defocus. At some stage in the journey of change, this degeneration and defocus was noticed, and a fresh effort was made to revive the change at different locations. Thus, the case series gives students the opportunity to examine the different stages of a change journey—the introduction of change; transferring it to multiple locations; sustaining change; possible .degeneration or defocus, leading to ritualization and loss of spirit; and the rejuvenation of change.

In Implementing Fortis Operating System (A), the president of strategy and organizational development at Fortis Healthcare Limited had to decide on a plan scale up change quickly and effectively.

Supplements:   9B18C019 (11 pages)

Learning objective:
This case can be used in courses on leadership, change management, and health care management at the post-graduate level. It is also suitable for executive education classes. Working through the (A) case allows students to
  • examine the nuances of a change implemented in a single hospital and of building a provision to scale up the change to multiple locations;
  • understand the various contributors to the success of a change effort, including the role of consultants;
  • understand how to apply Kotter’s 8-Step change model for initiating and implementing change; and
  • understand the factors that affect the scaling up of a change.


CasesBang, Nupur Pavan., Ramachandran, Kavil. "Dodla's Dilemma", Emerald Publishing Limited, Harvard Publishing, 2018Thomas Schmidheiny Centre for Family EnterpriseRead Description >Close >D. Sunil Reddy established Dodla Dairy in the year 1995 at Nellore district of Andhra Pradesh, as a greenfield company. An industrial engineer from Mangalore University, Sunil started Dodla Dairy at the age of 27, with the seed money given by his father. He would often wonder if the brand ‘Dodla’ and the Company sustain beyond ‘Sunil Dodla’. While Sunil continues to put in efforts to increase capacity, expand and capture more market share, he keeps asking himself, “What next”, “How do I build a legacy?” If the company had to move to the next orbit, both in term of size (revenues, assets, market share) as well as professionalization, certain organizational changes were necessary. “What were these changes and who would do it?” How could Sunil better prepare himself and the company for the future? How would the company move from being a family owned enterprise to a professionally run, sustainable organization? Would one of his daughters bring about that freshness by joining the company and yet provide continuity in terms of the family values? Would it be an outsider? “Who after me?” thought Sunil. After two decades, a certain degree of fatigue was beginning to set in and he had been contemplating his own role in the company. The days when he was under pressure or had a bad day, he would think of selling off the company, take the money and live peacefully ever after. On the other days, he would think of building a sustainable organization and leaving a legacy!

CasesBhatnagar, Navneet., Ramachandran, Kavil. "Touchdown Footwear on Slippery Slope", Emerald Publishing Limited, Harvard Publishing, 2018Thomas Schmidheiny Centre for Family EnterpriseRead Description >Close >This case is based on the professionalization and governance challenges faced by Touchdown Footwear Limited (TFL) – an Indian mid-sized footwear manufacturing family business. It was setup in1965 by three brothers, Ramnath, Krishna and Ganesh Pai who had inherited their father’s rubber trading business. Initially, TFL made flip flop slippers and catered to the local market. Over the years, TFL had a larger product portfolio, and by 2013, they had a pan-India presence with some exports to African markets. In the early years, the three brothers managed all functions. As the next generation grew up, they started joining the firm and took up different roles often based on business exigencies. By 2013, TFL had a turnover of 6.23 INR, but lacked a clear strategy and professional management. In the absence of appropriate structure, systems and processes, decision-making was ad-hoc. Inefficiencies and wastages were evident all across, and working capital was under severe strain. The firm suffered from governance deficit at both family and business levels. Lack of clear policies and processes delayed many crucial decisions. Earlier attempts to professionalize the business failed to achieve the desired results as family members neither had clear policies nor could change their mindset. Besides, there were questions about the level of commitment and discipline of the next generation. Vivek, the case protagonist, who managed TFL’s finances, realized the need for a transitional change on multiple fronts to sustain the business but was unclear about roadmap.

CasesKannan, Srikanth; Shah, Geetika. "Ashok Leyland (A): Reaching For the Stars - Embarking on a New Vision and Strategy", 2018Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Strategy
Industry: Automotive
Length: 14p
Subjects covered: Growth, Turnaround strategies, Acquisitions, Vision, Execution, Strategy, Implementing strategy
Publication Date: July 25, 2018
 
Description: 
This case documents the history of Ashok Leyland (AL), the second largest commercial vehicle manufacturer in India, and captures its growth and journey up to 2007, when the company adopted its new vision of more than doubling in size in a fairly mature industry. The challenge that the case poses to students is to understand how the firm, widely regarded as a small player globally and as a regional one even within India, could fulfill this ambitious vision.

Learning objective:
To examine the challenges in managing an aggressive vision for growth.

CasesKannan, Srikanth; Shah, Geetika. "Ashok Leyland (B): Shattered Dreams - Transformation For Survival", 2018Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Strategy
Industry: Automotive
Length: 14p
Subjects covered: Growth, Turnaround strategies, Acquisitions, Vision, Execution, Strategy, Implementing strategy
Publication Date: July 25, 2018
 
Description: 
The second part of this two-part case examines the actions that Ashok Leyland (AL) took to achieve its aggressive growth plan and the consequences it faced when there was an abrupt negative demand shock. The case describes the challenge before AL's management when faced with bankruptcy, and invites readers to consider how this once-proud company could be transformed and led towards profitability and growth.

Learning objective:
  1. To illustrate how a firm's performance and survival is impacted in a recessionary environment with declining industry factors.
  2. To evaluate business turnaround and recovery strategies available to firms operating in challenging economic conditions.
  3. To discuss the challenges in implementing and adjusting to tough strategies that would eventually take the firm on a path of recovery.


CasesKannan, Srikanth; Shah, Geetika. "Ashok Leyland: Shattered Dreams - Transformation For Survival (Combined Version)", 2018Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Strategy
Industry: Automotive
Length: 14p
Subjects covered: Growth, Turnaround strategies, Acquisitions, Vision, Execution, Strategy, Implementing strategy
Publication Date: July 25, 2018
 
Description: 
Case A & B (ISB113 & ISB115) have also been made available in a combined version.

Learning objective:
  1. To examine the challenges in managing an aggressive vision for growth.
  2. To illustrate how a firm's performance and survival is impacted in a recessionary environment with declining industry factors.
  3. To evaluate business turnaround and recovery strategies available to firms operating in challenging economic conditions.
  4. To discuss the challenges in implementing and adjusting to tough strategies that would eventually take the firm on a path of recovery.


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