Case, Simulation & Pedagogy

The ISB has constantly endeavoured to facilitate teaching excellence and upgrade pedagogy by bringing real-world knowledge into the classroom. One of the important ways it achieves this is through the development of business cases and simulations that enrich understanding of real-life management challenges at every level. In this pursuit, we have partnered with the Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario (Ivey), Canada to develop and promote high-quality case studies specific to India and the emerging markets with the support of ISB faculty as well as faculty from other leading B-schools worldwide.

CasesSubramaniam Ramnarayan, Sunita Mehta. "Implementing Fortis Operating System (A) & (B)", 2018Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Organizational Behaviour/Leadership
Industry: Health Care Services
Length: 16p
Subjects covered: change management, organizational change, health care management, leadership
Publication Date: June 29, 2018
 
Description: 
This case series allows students to examine the dynamics of an organization-wide operating system change that was implemented over a decade from 2007 to 2017. The change was initially introduced at Fortis Healthcare Limited in a single hospital and later successfully scaled up to multiple locations. The system worked well for some years before it fell victim to gradual degeneration and defocus. At some stage in the journey of change, this degeneration and defocus was noticed, and a fresh effort was made to revive the change at different locations. Thus, the case series gives students the opportunity to examine the different stages of a change journey—the introduction of change; transferring it to multiple locations; sustaining change; possible .degeneration or defocus, leading to ritualization and loss of spirit; and the rejuvenation of change.

In Implementing Fortis Operating System (A), the president of strategy and organizational development at Fortis Healthcare Limited had to decide on a plan scale up change quickly and effectively.

Supplements:   9B18C019 (11 pages)

Learning objective:
This case can be used in courses on leadership, change management, and health care management at the post-graduate level. It is also suitable for executive education classes. Working through the (A) case allows students to
  • examine the nuances of a change implemented in a single hospital and of building a provision to scale up the change to multiple locations;
  • understand the various contributors to the success of a change effort, including the role of consultants;
  • understand how to apply Kotter’s 8-Step change model for initiating and implementing change; and
  • understand the factors that affect the scaling up of a change.


CasesBang, Nupur Pavan., Ramachandran, Kavil. "Dodla's Dilemma", Emerald Publishing Limited, Harvard Publishing, 2018Thomas Schmidheiny Centre for Family EnterpriseRead Description >Close >D. Sunil Reddy established Dodla Dairy in the year 1995 at Nellore district of Andhra Pradesh, as a greenfield company. An industrial engineer from Mangalore University, Sunil started Dodla Dairy at the age of 27, with the seed money given by his father. He would often wonder if the brand ‘Dodla’ and the Company sustain beyond ‘Sunil Dodla’. While Sunil continues to put in efforts to increase capacity, expand and capture more market share, he keeps asking himself, “What next”, “How do I build a legacy?” If the company had to move to the next orbit, both in term of size (revenues, assets, market share) as well as professionalization, certain organizational changes were necessary. “What were these changes and who would do it?” How could Sunil better prepare himself and the company for the future? How would the company move from being a family owned enterprise to a professionally run, sustainable organization? Would one of his daughters bring about that freshness by joining the company and yet provide continuity in terms of the family values? Would it be an outsider? “Who after me?” thought Sunil. After two decades, a certain degree of fatigue was beginning to set in and he had been contemplating his own role in the company. The days when he was under pressure or had a bad day, he would think of selling off the company, take the money and live peacefully ever after. On the other days, he would think of building a sustainable organization and leaving a legacy!

CasesBhatnagar, Navneet., Ramachandran, Kavil. "Touchdown Footwear on Slippery Slope", Emerald Publishing Limited, Harvard Publishing, 2018Thomas Schmidheiny Centre for Family EnterpriseRead Description >Close >This case is based on the professionalization and governance challenges faced by Touchdown Footwear Limited (TFL) – an Indian mid-sized footwear manufacturing family business. It was setup in1965 by three brothers, Ramnath, Krishna and Ganesh Pai who had inherited their father’s rubber trading business. Initially, TFL made flip flop slippers and catered to the local market. Over the years, TFL had a larger product portfolio, and by 2013, they had a pan-India presence with some exports to African markets. In the early years, the three brothers managed all functions. As the next generation grew up, they started joining the firm and took up different roles often based on business exigencies. By 2013, TFL had a turnover of 6.23 INR, but lacked a clear strategy and professional management. In the absence of appropriate structure, systems and processes, decision-making was ad-hoc. Inefficiencies and wastages were evident all across, and working capital was under severe strain. The firm suffered from governance deficit at both family and business levels. Lack of clear policies and processes delayed many crucial decisions. Earlier attempts to professionalize the business failed to achieve the desired results as family members neither had clear policies nor could change their mindset. Besides, there were questions about the level of commitment and discipline of the next generation. Vivek, the case protagonist, who managed TFL’s finances, realized the need for a transitional change on multiple fronts to sustain the business but was unclear about roadmap.

CasesRamachandran, Kavil., Bhatnagar, Navneet. "Aurobindo Pharma Gearing Up for the Future", SAGE PUBLISHING, 2018Thomas Schmidheiny Centre for Family EnterpriseRead Description >Close >The Chairman and co-founder of the Hyderabad, India-based family-owned pharmaceutical company Aurobindo Pharma Limited (APL), P. V. Ramaprasad Reddy is reminiscing on his business growth journey. In 1986, along with a close friend, K. Nithyananda Reddy (no relation), and a few other associates, he started a small semisynthetic penicillin manufacturing unit. Since then the business had grown both organically and through strategic acquisitions. By 2011, APL was present in more than 125 countries. It had more than 500 drugs and intermediates spanning multiple therapeutic areas. As the business grew in size, scale, and scope so did its complexities, which demanded it adopt systematic processes, policies, and procedures. APL had adopted best practices in all functional areas and cultivated a culture of quality, to meet its objective to grow the business in the more demanding and developed markets of the USA and Europe. However, Ramaprasad pondered the future, specifically if APL was to continue to grow it had to further transform itself by professionalizing governance. Ramaprasad and Nithyananda were good friends and had effective control over APL. However, they were growing old due to which APL faced a leadership succession challenge. There was limited choice within the family and the next generation members were not prepared to take leadership positions in the company. The co-founders faced the dilemma of whether to groom someone within the family or to appoint a non-family professional at the helm.

CasesNupur Pavan Bang, Khemchand H. Sakaldeepi, Ramabhadran S. Thirumalai. "The Bombay Stock Exchange: Liquidity Enhancement Incentive Programmes", 2017Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Issues: liquidity, payment for order, exchanges, market microstructure, stocks
Disciplines:  Finance, International
Industries: Finance and Insurance
Setting: India, Large, 2013
Length: 16 pages (7 pages of text)
Intended Audience: MBA/Postgraduate
Publication Date: December 13, 2016

Abstract:
In 2013, the chief business officer at the Bombay Stock Exchange needed to prepare a recommendation on whether to pursue liquidity enhancement schemes in the equity cash market. The Bombay Stock Exchange, the oldest stock exchange in Asia, had held a monopoly in India until 1994, when the National Stock Exchange was launched. When derivatives were introduced to the Indian stock exchanges in 2000, the Bombay Stock Exchange had been unprepared, and the National Stock Exchange soon captured the entire derivatives market. In 2011, the Securities and Exchange Board of India approved the introduction of the Liquidity Enhancement Incentive Programmes on illiquid securities in the derivatives segment. The Bombay Stock Exchange then introduced the incentives for various illiquid products in the derivatives segment, but lost profit as a result of the incentives it paid out. Had the Liquidity Enhancement Incentive Programmes improved liquidity in the derivatives segment? Was it worth sacrificing profit to gain liquidity and market share? The chief business officer needed to address the long-term benefits of liquidity enhancement schemes and the merits of introducing such schemes to the Bombay Stock Exchange’s equity cash market.

Learning Objective:
This case is appropriate for an undergraduate or graduate course on security markets, with a specific focus on market liquidity and market structure. It may also be used in an undergraduate or graduate course on competitive strategy to illustrate how incentives can change competition, especially across two almost identical products: the National Stock Exchange’s Nifty Index and the Bombay Stock Exchange’s 100 Index. This case provides an alternative scenario to order-driven markets, whereby a stock exchange is able to significantly improve liquidity by incentivizing traders to participate in its derivatives market. The case can also be used to revisit the basic terminologies in derivatives and the unique features of the Indian stock market. After completion of the case, students will be able to
  • debate the importance of liquidity and how stock exchanges compete for liquidity;
  • compare the purchase order concept prevalent in the United States with the liquidity incentives schemes introduced in India;
  • analyze how liquidity incentive schemes can be used for the benefit of the entire securities market; and
  • understand the basic terminology of derivatives and the unique features of Indian stock markets.

     


CasesGhoshal, Tanuka ; Shah, Geetika ; Pereira, Arun . "Reinventing Officer's Choice Whisky: Spoiled for Choice", 2017Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Marketing
Industry: Alcoholic beverages
Length: 14 pages
Subjects covered: Advertising; Advertising campaigns; Brand management; Branding; Market positioning; Market research; Marketing; Marketing communications
Publication Date: December 20, 2016

Description: 
This case is designed to highlight the vital role of promotion, the fourth "P" of the marketing mix, in a brand reinvention exercise. Using the context of the brand reinvention journey of Officer's Choice Whisky (OCW), the case highlights the importance and need for syncing brand objectives and communication objectives so as to build brand relevance in a competitive environment, increase revenue and enhance customer loyalty. The case also highlights the importance of systematic market research in identifying brand weaknesses and providing direction for effective marketing communications.Ahmed Rahimtoola, Head of Marketing at Allied Blenders and Distillers (ABD), was leading the process of conducting an extensive brand reinvention exercise for Officer's Choice. Market research had established the need for brand reinvention, indicating that Officer's Choice had to overcome the challenges of low brand salience, lack of emotional connect with customers, and outdated brand communication. Accordingly, the best advertising agencies in India were invited to come up with creatives that would answer the following question: How should Officer's Choice reposition and repackage itself and reconnect with consumers? ABD had the tough task of choosing the creative that held the magic recipe that would strategically weave brand objectives and communication objectives to yield optimal benefits. In discussing the firm's creative options, the case brings to light the crucial aspects of a brand reinvention process, the role of communication objectives in brand reinvention, and the mechanics of a successful marriage of marketing communication and brand strategy objectives.

Learning objective: 
  1. To illustrate the challenges of brand reinvention and the opportunities provided by marketing communications.
  2. To understand how branding and positioning strategy should stem from consumer behavior insights gathered from market research.
  3. To demonstrate that the selection of ad creatives can be facilitated by using systematic criteria that take into consideration the strategy of the firm, key brand objectives and communication objectives.

     


CasesChakrabarti, Rajesh;  Sujlana, Digvijay Singh . "SREI Sahaj E-Village (A)", 2017Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Service Management
Length: 22 pages
Subjects covered: Business model innovation; Service management
Publication Date: December 22, 2016

Description: 
Sahaj e-Village Limited, an initiative of SREI Infrastructure Finance Ltd, hoped to answer the need of the Indian government's National e-Governance Plan (NeGP) to set up 100,000 Common Service Centres (CSCs) across rural India in 2006. This figure was subsequently revised to 250,000 CSCs in 2009. Sahaj aimed to bridge the digital divide between urban and rural India and set up one of the largest brick and mortar --and human --networks in rural India. With close to 27,000 IT-backed centers in villages with a population of less than 10,000 and 50 critical services in the domains of microinsurance, education, utility and government-to-citizen (G2C) services to over 300,000,000 rural people, Sahaj e-Village was literally taking urban services to the remotest nooks of rural India. Sahaj CSCs would provide rural consumers with direct access to modern, state-of-the-art technological facilities and computer education, thus dovetailing with its long-term plans of providing Internet connectivity across rural India. Case A, set in July 2010, presents the tough challenge that the top management at Sahaj e-Village Ltd had on its hands. It was serving a virtually untouched rural market through a greenfield project with a jittery workforce in place and was justifiably concerned about the viability and sustainability of the business.

Learning objective: 
The case introduces the reader to the fiduciary concerns of social enterprises and the restrictions faced by government-led enterprises when they plan to scale up of their organizations. Students are led to analyze organized and unorganized employment opportunities and challenges. The case lets students analyze and understand the:
  1. Dynamics of the social networking market
  2. e-Village business model and
  3. Importance of an appropriate business model in the rural social entrepreneurship space.


CasesChakrabarti, Rajesh;  Sujlana, Digvijay Singh . "SREI Sahaj E-Village (A)", 2017Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Service Management
Length: 22 pages
Subjects covered: Business model innovation; Service management
Publication Date: December 22, 2016

Description: 
Sahaj e-Village Limited, an initiative of SREI Infrastructure Finance Ltd, hoped to answer the need of the Indian government's National e-Governance Plan (NeGP) to set up 100,000 Common Service Centres (CSCs) across rural India in 2006. This figure was subsequently revised to 250,000 CSCs in 2009. Sahaj aimed to bridge the digital divide between urban and rural India and set up one of the largest brick and mortar --and human --networks in rural India. With close to 27,000 IT-backed centers in villages with a population of less than 10,000 and 50 critical services in the domains of microinsurance, education, utility and government-to-citizen (G2C) services to over 300,000,000 rural people, Sahaj e-Village was literally taking urban services to the remotest nooks of rural India. Sahaj CSCs would provide rural consumers with direct access to modern, state-of-the-art technological facilities and computer education, thus dovetailing with its long-term plans of providing Internet connectivity across rural India. Case A, set in July 2010, presents the tough challenge that the top management at Sahaj e-Village Ltd had on its hands. It was serving a virtually untouched rural market through a greenfield project with a jittery workforce in place and was justifiably concerned about the viability and sustainability of the business.

Learning objective: 
The case introduces the reader to the fiduciary concerns of social enterprises and the restrictions faced by government-led enterprises when they plan to scale up of their organizations. Students are led to analyze organized and unorganized employment opportunities and challenges. The case lets students analyze and understand the:
  1. Dynamics of the social networking market
  2. e-Village business model and
  3. Importance of an appropriate business model in the rural social entrepreneurship space.


CasesChakrabarti, Rajesh;  Sujlana, Digvijay Singh . "SREI Sahaj E-Village (B)", 2017Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Discipline: Service Management
Length: 14 pages
Subjects covered: Business model innovation; Service management
Publication Date: December 22, 2016

Description: 
Sahaj e-Village Limited, an initiative of SREI Infrastructure Finance Ltd, hoped to answer the need of the Indian government's National e-Governance Plan (NeGP) to set up 100,000 Common Service Centres (CSCs) across rural India in 2006. This figure was subsequently revised to 250,000 CSCs in 2009. Sahaj aimed to bridge the digital divide between urban and rural India and set up one of the largest brick and mortar --and human --networks in rural India. With close to 27,000 IT-backed centers in villages with a population of less than 10,000 and 50 critical services in the domains of microinsurance, education, utility and government-to-citizen (G2C) services to over 300,000,000 rural people, Sahaj e-Village was literally taking urban services to the remotest nooks of rural India. Sahaj CSCs would provide rural consumers with direct access to modern, state-of-the-art technological facilities and computer education, thus dovetailing with its long-term plans of providing Internet connectivity across rural India. Case B moves ahead from the challenge described in Case A and outlines Sahaj's transformation process. Starting August 2010, Sahaj guided its troops through an ideological transformation that would take the organization from being primarily a government service provider to an enterprising business entity capable of fending for itself. In order to achieve this goal, Sahaj took the important first step of understanding the intricacies and dynamics of the relationships among the various stakeholders involved in the project. This, in a sense, proved to be a breakthrough in the organization's transformation process.

Learning objective: 
The case introduces the reader to the fiduciary concerns of social enterprises and the restrictions faced by government-led enterprises when they plan to scale up of their organizations. Students are led to analyze organized and unorganized employment opportunities and challenges. The case lets students analyze and understand the:
  1. Dynamics of the social networking market
  2. e-Village business model and
  3. Importance of an appropriate business model in the rural social entrepreneurship space.


CasesSingh, Davinder;  Sahu, Anuj . "Forbes Technosys Limited (B): Bill Payment Kiosk Business", 2017Centre for Learning and Management PracticeRead Description >Close >Issues: business model, mobile, billing
Disciplines:  General Management/Strategy
Industries: Other Services
Setting: India, Medium, 2010
Length: 6 pages (4 pages of text)
Intended Audience: MBA/Postgraduate
Publication Date: December 19, 2016

Abstract:
In May 2010, Forbes Technosys Limited (FTL) was not doing well. After more than a year, the company’s bill payment kiosk business was losing money and no longer seemed viable. The time had come to re-evaluate all aspects of this business line and make decisions regarding FTL’s future course of action. Accordingly, FTL’s chief executive officer proposed an idea regarding prepaid mobile recharges using the existing bill payment kiosks, along with a new technology platform for this purpose. He hoped that handheld terminals could be used by retail-level franchisees to sell recharges to prepaid mobile users. Essentially, FTL had three options: should the company persist with or pivot the service provider business model, or “perish” the complete solution provider idea entirely and revert to being a product manufacturer? Whichever strategy FTL chose, it would have to limit and balance both operating and capital expenses. Use with 9B16M221

Learning Objective:
This case can be used during a course on strategic innovation management, which is usually scheduled in the second half of an MBA/postgraduate program or executive MBA program. It can be used to teach students about the following concepts:
  • Making strategic choices about business models, especially the choice between being a service provider and a product manufacturer while pursuing innovation.
  • Making decisions as to whether to persist, pivot, or perish in a particular business model while pursuing new business opportunities.




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