Working Papers

Working PapersPedada, Kiran., Shankar, Venkatesh.,Dass, Mayukh. "The Effects of International Marketing Joint Venture Dissolutions on the Shareholder Value of Emerging Market Firms"Read Abstract >Close >
Working PapersUppal, Abhinav., Bradlow, Eric T..,Yildirim, Pinar. "A Bayesian Learning Model for Product Hierarchies"
Working PapersUppal, Abhinav., Jerath, Kinshuk.,Raju, Jagmohan S. "A Theory of Selling Formats in Retailing: Direct versus Mediated Access"Read Abstract >Close >Retailers worldwide employ various selling formats characterized by different degrees to which customers can access and inspect products in the store. In the direct access format, all available products are stocked on shelves directly accessible to customers for inspection, while store associates offer minimal assistance. In the \"mediated access\" format, retail stores are manned by shopkeepers who offer one product at a time to customers and the customers decide whether to purchase an offered product or to ask for an alternative. We build a theoretical model in which a retailer makes selling format, product assortment and pricing decisions, and consumers have shopping costs. There are two products: a general purpose brand that provides the same utility uniformly to all consumers, and a specialized brand that gives ex ante uncertain utility to a consumer that can be higher or lower than the utility of the general purpose brand, and a consumer can resolve this by inspecting this brand. We find that the retailer chooses the mediated access selling format with the specialized brand offered first when customers' uncertainty about fit with the specialized brand is large (as long as the retailer's margin on the general purpose brand is not too high). If consumers' uncertainty about fit with the specialized brand is medium, the retailer chooses to internalize consumer shopping costs by employing the direct access format and carries both brands. If consumers' uncertainty about fit with the specialized brand is small, the retailer chooses the mediated access format carrying only the general purpose brand. Our model offers an explanation for the observation that the mediated access selling format is more popular in emerging markets (as compared to developed markets) where consumers' shopping costs (e.g., cost of time) are typically small, but in these markets this format is less popular for large, organized retailers (as compared to small, unorganized retailers) that may be able to obtain better trading terms, e.g., larger retail margins, from upstream sellers.

Working PapersPedada, Kiran., Shankar, Venkatesh.,Dass, Mayukh. "Determinants of International Marketing Joint Venture Dissolutions in Emerging Markets"Read Abstract >Close >
Working PapersBhatnagar, Navneet., Ramachandran, Kavil. "Emami’s Mission to the Next Orbit"Thomas Schmidheiny Centre for Family EnterpriseRead Abstract >Close >This case is about the challenges of professionalisation and succession faced by an Indian, family controlled, personal-care products company, Emami Limited. Emami was setup in 1974 at Kolkata by two childhood friends, Radhe Shyam Agarwal (RSA) and Radhe Shyam Goenka (RSG). They started with a small capital of INR 20,000 and had grown the business to INR 1.8 bn in sales by financial year 2013-14. Emami had earned a reputation for being innovative in development of products based on keen consumer insights. Ever since Emami tasted initial success in business (i.e. within 3-4 years of its inception), the company adopted an inorganic strategy for growth and made several strategic business acquisitions. As the business grew, it implemented organizational changes, brought in functional experts from outside and professionalised its operations. During the first four decades since it was founded, Emami grew its product portfolio to include ayurvedic formulations and nutraceuticals. Besides, the group diversified in other businesses such as paper, real estate and construction. However, Emami Limited, the personal care company continued to be the group’s flagship that generated most of its wealth. Business growth increased the complexities of Emami’s operations. In order to manage those complexities Emami made efforts to professionalise their systems and processes. However, as the founders grew older, they had realized the need for succession planning to pass on the leadership to the next generation. They were also cognizant of the need to establish family governance mechanisms and structures to ensure Emami’s sustainability across generations. Another key challenge they faced was how and whom to select as their successor because their children had been brought up together, had similar educational qualifications, business experience and performance record. It was quite hard for them to pick one member over the other.

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