Working PapersBang, Nupur Pavan., Ramachandran, Kavil., Vishwanthan, Anierudh. "Evidence on Family Firm Performance and Relevance of Context in an Emerging Economy"Read Abstract >Close >Ownership of firms and their impact on firm performance has been a topic of interest for long. Concentrated ownership of a firm in the hands of a family presents unique opportunities and challenges that may have an impact on the performance of the firm. Multiple studies have arrived at differing conclusions with regards to performance of family firms. Using a unique proprietary database of scientifically classified listed family and non-family firms this paper studies the impact of family ownership, control and management on firm performance through the lens of external and internal context. It thus advances the debate that has so far been skewed towards studies from the developed markets, larger firms and micro analysis. Using accounting and market measures of firm performance, we conduct a time-series cross-sectional comparison of family and non-family firms. Our analyses consistently reveal that family firms performed poorly in comparison to non-family firms in India. We also find that the impact of family does not weaken over time and that family management results in poorer performance. We, therefore, conclude that family ownership, control and managementm per se are a significant impediment to firm performance in emerging markets contexts like India.

Working PapersVishwanthan, Anierudh.,Bang, Nupur Pavan., Ramachandran, Kavil. "Parenting among Business Groups: An Emerging Market’s Perspective"Read Abstract >Close >Emerging markets witness a significant overlap between social communities, families and business activities. This paper attempts to decipher a source of heterogeneity, which is business group affiliation among family firms. This paper details the reasons why business group affiliation is beneficial in an emerging market by employing the concept of parenting to reconcile the potential deficiencies of business group affiliation pointed out by various strategy scholars. We use two proxies to measure the extent of parenting namely, firm leadership by a family member and promoting family’s shareholding in the group affiliate company. The study has been conducted in the Indian economic context using a dataset consisting of 3,728 listed companies. Results show that superior parenting realized by professional firm leadership and higher promoter shareholding leads to superior financial performance among family business group firms.

Working PapersBang, Nupur Pavan.,Vishwanthan, Anierudh., Ramachandran, Kavil. "Evidence on Family Firm Performance and Relevance of Context in an Emerging Economy"Read Abstract >Close >Ownership of firms and their impact on firm performance has been a topic of interest for long. Concentrated ownership of a firm in the hands of a family presents unique opportunities and challenges that may have an impact on the performance of the firm. Multiple studies have arrived at differing conclusions with regards to performance of family firms. Using a unique proprietary database of scientifically classified listed family and non-family firms this paper studies the impact of family ownership, control and management on firm performance through the lens of external and internal context. It thus advances the debate that has so far been skewed towards studies from the developed markets, larger firms and micro analysis. Using accounting and market measures of firm performance, we conduct a time-series cross-sectional comparison of family and non-family firms. Our analyses consistently reveal that family firms performed poorly in comparison to non-family firms in India. We also find that the impact of family does not weaken over time and that family management results in poorer performance. We, therefore, conclude that family ownership, control and management per se are a significant impediment to firm performance in emerging markets contexts like India.

Working PapersBhatnagar, Navneet.,Sharma, Pramodita., Ramachandran, Kavil. "Spirituality and Corporate Philanthropy in Indian Family Firms "Read Abstract >Close >Family firms are known to help local community through philanthropy. Scholars have examined the nature, process, and outcomes of family firm philanthropy. However, the study of heterogeneity in their philanthropy motives across cultural contexts has received inadequate attention. Based on 16 cases of Indian family firms, this paper examines the influence of spirituality on family firm philanthropy. The paper presents a typology of family firm philanthropy by juxtaposing two dimensions: (i) ‘Dharma’ - i.e., the firm’s sense of duty towards society, and (ii) ‘Karma’ - i.e., the degree of family involvement in philanthropy. Four distinct philanthropic engagement profiles are identified.

Working PapersBhatnagar, Navneet., Ramachandran, Kavil., Ray, Sougata. "Perfecting the Mould:How Indian Family Firms are Developing their Next Generation Leaders"Read Abstract >Close >Continuity of family legacy and control over the family business depends on effective inter-generational leadership transition. Weak next generation leadership is known to be one of the main reasons for the failure of family firms (Miller, 2015). Hence, developing effective next generation leadership is most crucial to ensure long-term sustenance of family business. That involves a long and systematic process spread over time and acts. Though next generation leadership development is a significant process for the future of family business, it has not been studied well, more specifically in an emerging economy context. This paper examines case studies of next generation leadership development process of 15 Indian family firms. The pathways adopted in this process by the senior and next generation leaders are identified. Case study analysis finds two broad phases of leadership development that involve acquisition of multiple capabilities. The next generation member builds intrapersonal capabilities in the family business context during Phase I and interpersonal capabilities in Phase II. Some of the stages in between were found to be critical for successful leadership development, in absence of which, family businesses failed to achieve effective inter-generational leadership transition. Mapping all the capability development stages observed, a conceptual framework for next generation leadership development process is presented in the paper. The paper concludes with implications and future research suggestions

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