Agenda

REGISTRATION
 
INAUGURAL SESSION
 
Dialogue I: GEOPOLITICS, NEIGHBOURHOOD AND PARADIPLOMACY

In the current global scenario, state governments in India attempt to enhance their international engagement giving rise to paradiplomacy, which deals with the foreign policy capacity of subnational governments. Paradiplomacy helps in deepening democracies, and there is immense scope for strengthening engagement with countries through paradiplomacy. Similarities among cities across borders could be identified and brought together for stronger economic engagement through revisiting sister-city agreements. Also, culture and sentiments are important artefacts for any community, irrespective of international borders. The polity from both sides understand the importance of these artefacts and could come together despite many other critical differences. The opening of the Kartarpur corridor is a great example, and we should brainstorm on the expansion of this corridor into a trade and tourism corridor across both sides of Punjab. The objective of the session is also to relook at the nature, scope and limitations of sister-city and sister-state agreements through paradiplomacy.

 
DIALOGUE II: SEEDING DIPLOMACY THROUGH AGRICULTURE: LEARNINGS FROM GLOBAL BEST PRACTICES

Agricultural development is one of the most powerful tools to end extreme poverty, boost shared prosperity and feed a projected 9.7 billion people by 2050, globally. Growth in the agriculture sector is more effective in raising incomes among the poorest compared to other sectors. In India, to ensure food and nutritional security for the growing population and to increase farmers' income, there is an urgent need to enhance resource use efficiency, reduce input costs and improve crop yields. Agriculture as a sector is transforming due to the vast use of technology. There are many initiatives and best practices in the world through which the Indian states could learn and localise it. For example, the Shivalik states are strong in horticulture and one could learn from The Netherlands, especially on how they use robotic greenhouses to enhance horticulture produce; the advanced irrigation systems implemented by Israel could help in water management for agriculture in the slopes of the Shivaliks; one could learn from how New Zealand and Italy are working on progressive dairy farming techniques, among other examples. The objective of the session is to learn from the global best practices on the use of agricultural technologies to enhance agricultural productivity and to ensure universal food security for Indian citizens.

 
DIALOGUE III: ENGAGING THE OVERSEAS INDIAN COMMUNITIES

One of the important aspects of India’s growth story is its vibrant diaspora. It is popularly said that 'the sun never sets on Indians' because Indians are present in almost all the countries of the world. Punjabis from India migrated to various countries across the world at different historical periods. There are around 10 million Punjabi diasporas mostly concentrated in North America, South East Asia, Australia, many European countries and the Middle East. Most of them migrated in various capacities: professionals, indentured labourers, traders and businessmen. The current levels of globalisation and technology help in greater people-to-people connect, which puts the overseas Indians in a position to look back at their home country and play a part in the country’s development. In this context, it is important to establish policies and institutions to manage the transnational roles of overseas Indians, as well as facilitating the exploration of global opportunities. The Shivalik states together could come up with renewed policies to encourage such transnational engagement of its diaspora.

 
DIALOGUE IV: Cooperative Federalism and INDIAN Foreign Policy

With changing times, foreign policy keeps evolving. Moreover, in the current age of technology, Indian foreign policy is strongly connected to cooperative federalism, where the Indian states have the mandate to create their own international brands. One of the possible approaches to contribute to the foreign policy of the country is that some of the states, which share huge commonalities in terms of geography and economy, could come together and promote themselves together. In this context, the Shivalik states could come together and create required policies and outreach together. The objective of the inaugural session of the dialogue is to explore such possibilities for the concerned states to create a brand together as the Shivalik States and look for international partnerships with concerned global players.

IN CONVERSATION WITH KRISHNAMURTHY SUBRAMANIAn, CHIEF ECONOMIC ADVISoR, government OF INDIA
 
VALEDICTORY SESSION